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Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves

Author

Listed:
  • Brian Bell

    (University of Oxford and Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics)

  • Francesco Fasani

    (Institute for Economic Analysis, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics and INSIDE-MOVE)

  • Stephen Machin

    (University College London, and Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper focuses on empirical connections between crime and immigration, studying two large waves of recent U.K. immigration (the late 1990s/early 2000s asylum seekers and the post-2004 inflow from EU accession countries). The first wave led to a modest but significant rise in property crime, while the second wave had a small negative impact. There was no effect on violent crime; arrest rates were not different, and changes in crime cannot be ascribed to crimes against immigrants. The findings are consistent with the notion that differences in labor market opportunities of different migrant groups shape their potential impact on crime. © 2013 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Bell & Francesco Fasani & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(4), pages 1278-1290, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:95:y:2013:i:4:p:1278-1290
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    crime; immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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