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Crime and unemployment: Evidence from Europe

  • Altindag, Duha T.

I investigate the impact of unemployment on crime using a country-level panel data set from Europe that contains consistently measured crime statistics. Unemployment has a positive influence on property crimes. Using earthquakes, industrial accidents and the exchange rate movements as instruments for the unemployment rate, I find that 2SLS point estimates are larger than OLS estimates.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Law and Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 145-157

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Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:32:y:2012:i:1:p:145-157
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/irle

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