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Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado

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  • Bradley Ewing
  • Jamie Kruse
  • Mark Thompson

Abstract

This research examined the impact of the 3 May 1999 tornado on the Oklahoma City labour market. We estimated time series models that allow for time-varying variance in employment growth. The models include intervention variables designed to capture the tornado's effect at initial impact as well as over the post-tornado period. In terms of total employment growth, the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) experienced an increase in employment growth and a reduction in labour market risk in the sample period following the tornado. The analysis also examined the effect of the weather event on eight industrial sectors. Five of eight sectors experienced significant decreases in labour market risk after the tornado. Our evidence suggests that Oklahoma City and surrounding communities that make up the Metropolitan Statistical Area survived the disaster without suffering any extended adverse labour market effects. Our results indicate that at least in the aggregate, the labour market improved. “… what has so often excited wonder, the great rapidity with which countries recover from a state of devastation; the disappearance, in a short time, of all traces of the mischiefs done by earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and the ravages of war … all the inhabitants are ruined, and yet in a few years after, everything is much as it was before.” - J.S. Mill (1848)

Suggested Citation

  • Bradley Ewing & Jamie Kruse & Mark Thompson, 2009. "Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 691-702.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:6:p:691-702
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840601007468
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
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    7. Bradley T. Ewing & Jamie Brown Kruse, 2002. "The Impact of Project Impact on the Wilmington, North Carolina, Labor Market," Public Finance Review, , vol. 30(4), pages 296-309, July.
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    9. Ewing, Bradley T. & Kruse, Jamie Brown & Thompson, Mark A., 2004. "Employment Dynamics and the Nashville Tornado," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bradley T. Ewing & Daan Liang & Yuepeng Cui, 2014. "A Time Series Approach to Examining Regional Economic Resiliency to Hurricanes," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(2), pages 369-391, April.
    2. Strulik, Holger & Trimborn, Timo, 2014. "Natural disasters and macroeconomic performance: The role of residential investment," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 194, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Nielsen-Pincus, Max & Moseley, Cassandra & Gebert, Krista, 2014. "Job growth and loss across sectors and time in the western US: The impact of large wildfires," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 199-206.
    4. Strulik, Holger & Trimborn, Timo, 2016. "Natural disasters and macroeconomic performance," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 07/2016, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).
    5. Altindag, Duha T., 2012. "Crime and unemployment: Evidence from Europe," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 145-157.
    6. Yuepeng Cui & Daan Liang & Bradley T. Ewing & Ali Nejat, 2016. "Development, specification and validation of Hurricane Resiliency Index," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(3), pages 2149-2165, July.
    7. Hyun Kim & David Marcouiller, 2015. "Considering disaster vulnerability and resiliency: the case of hurricane effects on tourism-based economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(3), pages 945-971, May.
    8. Ariel Belasen & Chifeng Dai, 2014. "When oceans attack: assessing the impact of hurricanes on localized taxable sales," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(2), pages 325-342, March.

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