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Local labour market impacts of climate-related disasters: a demand-and-supply analysis

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  • Sultana Zeenat Fouzia
  • Jianhong Mu
  • Yong Chen

Abstract

Using US county-level data from 1991 to 2015, the labour market impacts from various climate-related disasters are examined. It is found that different disasters have statistically and economically different impacts on local employment and wage. The standard economic demand–supply analysis can help to understand the heterogeneous impacts of disasters on these labour market outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Sultana Zeenat Fouzia & Jianhong Mu & Yong Chen, 2020. "Local labour market impacts of climate-related disasters: a demand-and-supply analysis," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 336-352, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:specan:v:15:y:2020:i:3:p:336-352
    DOI: 10.1080/17421772.2019.1701699
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