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When oceans attack: assessing the impact of hurricanes on localized taxable sales

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  • Ariel Belasen

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  • Chifeng Dai

    ()

Abstract

We examine the impact of hurricanes in Florida on county-level taxable sales revenues. Conditional on the strength of the hurricane, within 6 months after a hurricane strikes a county, revenues decline as much as 17 %, whereas revenues in neighboring counties increase by upward of 17 % over that same time frame. This decline in revenue is found to be dependent on the commercial makeup of a hurricane-stricken county. Particular focus is given to tourism-related subsectors within the local economy. Finally, we show that along the pathways of hurricanes, initially hit counties face a more severe burden, ranging as high as a 33 % immediate decline in taxable revenues in 1 month for coastal counties. As the hurricane weakens, the direct impact is lessened; however, there is evidence of spillover damage in neighboring areas. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Ariel Belasen & Chifeng Dai, 2014. "When oceans attack: assessing the impact of hurricanes on localized taxable sales," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(2), pages 325-342, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:52:y:2014:i:2:p:325-342
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-013-0587-8
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00168-013-0587-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yu Xiao, 2011. "Local Economic Impacts Of Natural Disasters," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 804-820, October.
    2. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2008. "How Hurricanes Affect Wages and Employment in Local Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 49-53, May.
    3. Eric Strobl, 2011. "The Economic Growth Impact of Hurricanes: Evidence from U.S. Coastal Counties," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 575-589, May.
    4. Belasen, Ariel R. & Polachek, Solomon, 2008. "How Hurricanes Affect Employment and Wages in Local Labor Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 3407, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Adam Rose & Shu‐Yi Liao, 2005. "Modeling Regional Economic Resilience to Disasters: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis of Water Service Disruptions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 75-112, February.
    6. Bradley Ewing & Jamie Kruse & Mark Thompson, 2009. "Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 691-702.
    7. Sungbin Cho & Peter Gordon & James E. Moore II & Harry W. Richardson & Masanobu Shinozuka & Stephanie Chang, 2001. "Integrating Transportation Network and Regional Economic Models to Estimate the Costs of a Large Urban Earthquake," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 39-65, February.
    8. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2009. "How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
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    Cited by:

    1. Jianhong E. Mu & Yong Chen, 2016. "Impacts of large natural disasters on regional income," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 83(3), pages 1485-1503, September.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:3:p:869-:d:204166 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    H71; R11;

    JEL classification:

    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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