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A Time Series Approach to Examining Regional Economic Resiliency to Hurricanes

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  • Bradley T. Ewing
  • Daan Liang
  • Yuepeng Cui

Abstract

Hurricanes disrupt business processes and activities, energy distribution and consumption, and services of infrastructure and lead to a reallocation of resources and their uses. This research models the relationship among economic and engineering measures of the state of the built environment in order to provide insight into a region's ability to withstand and recover from a future hurricane. As such, we provide a quantitative approach to modeling and measuring a region's economic resiliency. The findings have implications for developing strategies for long-term sustainability of economic regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Bradley T. Ewing & Daan Liang & Yuepeng Cui, 2014. "A Time Series Approach to Examining Regional Economic Resiliency to Hurricanes," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(2), pages 369-391, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ajecsc:v:73:y:2014:i:2:p:369-391
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/ajes.12071
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yuepeng Cui & Daan Liang & Bradley T. Ewing & Ali Nejat, 2016. "Development, specification and validation of Hurricane Resiliency Index," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(3), pages 2149-2165, July.

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