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The Impact of Project Impact on the Wilmington, North Carolina, Labor Market

Author

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  • Bradley T. Ewing

    (Texas Tech University)

  • Jamie Brown Kruse

    (Texas Tech University)

Abstract

In 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced a new initiative called Project Impact. The initiative was designed to make communities more resistant and resilient to the disruption and disaster associated with natural hazards. One of the pilot communities was Wilmington/New Hanover County, North Carolina, an area susceptible to hurricanes and tropical storms. This article examines the impact of Project Impact on this community’s labor market, allowing for the disturbances caused by the storms themselves. The findings suggest that the activities and coordination efforts associated with Project Impact coincide with improvements in the Wilmington labor market characterized by a lower natural unemployment rate and a reduction of labor market risk. These findings may be taken as evidence that Project Impact can improve the performance of a local economy. The results suggest that at the very least, increased interaction between public and private sectors may be associated with improved labor market conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Bradley T. Ewing & Jamie Brown Kruse, 2002. "The Impact of Project Impact on the Wilmington, North Carolina, Labor Market," Public Finance Review, , vol. 30(4), pages 296-309, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:30:y:2002:i:4:p:296-309
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    Cited by:

    1. Bradley Ewing & Jamie Kruse & Mark Thompson, 2009. "Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 691-702.
    2. Greenberg, Michael & Mantell, Nancy & Lahr, Michael & Felder, Frank & Zimmerman, Rae, 2007. "Short and intermediate economic impacts of a terrorist-initiated loss of electric power: Case study of New Jersey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 722-733, January.
    3. Yuepeng Cui & Daan Liang & Bradley T. Ewing & Ali Nejat, 2016. "Development, specification and validation of Hurricane Resiliency Index," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 82(3), pages 2149-2165, July.
    4. Hyun Kim & David Marcouiller, 2015. "Considering disaster vulnerability and resiliency: the case of hurricane effects on tourism-based economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(3), pages 945-971, May.
    5. Edmiston, Kelly D., 2017. "Financial Vulnerability and Personal Finance Outcomes of Natural Disasters," Research Working Paper RWP 17-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    6. Ewing, Bradley T. & Kruse, Jamie Brown & Thompson, Mark A., 2004. "Employment Dynamics and the Nashville Tornado," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 34(2).

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