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Short and intermediate economic impacts of a terrorist-initiated loss of electric power: Case study of New Jersey

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  • Greenberg, Michael
  • Mantell, Nancy
  • Lahr, Michael
  • Felder, Frank
  • Zimmerman, Rae

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  • Greenberg, Michael & Mantell, Nancy & Lahr, Michael & Felder, Frank & Zimmerman, Rae, 2007. "Short and intermediate economic impacts of a terrorist-initiated loss of electric power: Case study of New Jersey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 722-733, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:35:y:2007:i:1:p:722-733
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paulo Guimaraes & Frank L. Hefner & Douglas P. Woodward, 1993. "Wealth And Income Effects Of Natural Disasters: An Econometric Analysis Of Hurricane Hugo," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 23(2), pages 97-114, Fall.
    2. Adam Rose & Shu-Yi Liao, 2005. "Modeling Regional Economic Resilience to Disasters: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis of Water Service Disruptions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 75-112.
    3. Felder, Frank A., 2001. ""An Island of Technicality in a Sea of Discretion": A Critique of Existing Electric Power Systems Reliability Analysis and Policy," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 21-31, April.
    4. Felder, Frank A., 2004. "Shining Light, Not Shedding Light," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 51-54.
    5. Larry Dale & James C. Murdoch & Mark A. Thayer & Paul A. Waddell, 1999. "Do Property Values Rebound from Environmental Stigmas? Evidence from Dallas," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(2), pages 311-326.
    6. Michael Lahr, 2001. "Reconciling Domestication Techniques, the Notion of Re-exports and Some Comments on Regional Accounting," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 165-179.
    7. Bradley T. Ewing & Jamie Brown Kruse, 2002. "The Impact of Project Impact on the Wilmington, North Carolina, Labor Market," Public Finance Review, , vol. 30(4), pages 296-309, July.
    8. Mark Skidmore & Hideki Toya, 2002. "Do Natural Disasters Promote Long-Run Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 664-687, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Adriàn Romero & Omar Osvaldo Chisari & Leonardo Javier Mastronardi & Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano, 2015. "The cost of failing to prevent gas supply interruption: A CGE assessment for Peru," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(2), pages 131-148.
    2. Coaffee, Jon, 2008. "Risk, resilience, and environmentally sustainable cities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 4633-4638, December.
    3. Keirstead, James & Jennings, Mark & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2012. "A review of urban energy system models: Approaches, challenges and opportunities," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 3847-3866.
    4. Hines, Paul & Apt, Jay & Talukdar, Sarosh, 2009. "Large blackouts in North America: Historical trends and policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5249-5259, December.
    5. Umberto Monarca & Ernesto Cassetta & Alessandro Sarra & Cesare Pozzi, 2015. "Integrating renewable energy sources into electricity markets: Power system operation, resource adequacy and market design," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(2), pages 149-166.

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