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Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration

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  • Kristin F. Butcher
  • Anne Morrison Piehl

Abstract

Among 18-40 year old men in the United States, immigrants are less likely to be institutionalized than the native-born, and much less likely to be institutionalized than native-born men with similar demographic characteristics. Furthermore, earlier immigrants are more likely to be institutionalized than more recent immigrants. Although all immigrant cohorts appear to assimilate toward the higher institutionalization rates of the native-born as time in the country increases, recent immigrants do not increase their institutionalization rates as quickly as one would predict from the experience of earlier immigrant cohorts. These results are the opposite of what one would predict from the literature on immigrant earnings, where earlier immigrants are typically found to have better permanent labor market characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 1997. "Recent Immigrants: Unexpected Implications for Crime and Incarceration," NBER Working Papers 6067, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6067 Note: LS
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pieter A. Gautier & Arjen Siegmann & Aico van Vuuren, 2007. "The Effect of the Theo van Gogh Murder on House Prices in Amsterdam," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-013/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 2005. "Why are immigrants' incarceration rates so low? evidence on selective immigration, deterrence, and deportation," Working Paper Series WP-05-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    3. James P. Smith, 2006. "Immigrants and the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 203-234, April.
    4. Gehrsitz, Markus & Ungerer, Martin, 2016. "Jobs, cime, and votes: A short-run evaluation of the refugee crisis in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-086, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Piopiunik, Marc & Ruhose, Jens, 2017. "Immigration, regional conditions, and crime: Evidence from an allocation policy in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 258-282.
    6. Milo Bianchi & Paolo Buonanno & Paolo Pinotti, 2012. "Do Immigrants Cause Crime?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1318-1347, December.
    7. Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Nancy E. Reichman & Ofira Schwartz-Soicher, 2006. "Crime and Circumstance: The Effects of Infant Health Shocks on Fathers' Criminal Activity," Working Papers 913, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    8. Alejandro Gaviria & Carlos Medina & Jorge Tamayo, 2010. "Assessing the Link between Adolescent Fertility and Urban Crime," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 006860, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    9. Duleep, Harriet & Regets, Mark, 2002. "The Elusive Concept of Immigrant Quality: Evidence from 1970-1990," IZA Discussion Papers 631, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Gordon Hanson, 2010. "The Governance of Migration Policy," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 185-207.
    11. Mayda, Anna Maria & Peri, Giovanni & Steingress, Walter, 2015. "Immigration to the U.S.: A problem for the Republicans or the Democrats?," CEPR Discussion Papers 11001, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Morrison Piehl, 2000. "The Role of Deportation in the Incarceration of Immigrants," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 351-386 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. repec:pri:crcwel:wp06-35-ff is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:ces:ifodic:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:18175088 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Jess Benhabib & Boyan Jovanovic, 2012. "Optimal Migration: A World Perspective," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(2), pages 321-348, May.
    16. Angela Bruns Bruns, 2016. "Consequences of Partner Incarceration for Women's Employment," Working Papers 16-01-ff, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    17. Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Nancy E. Reichman & Ofira Schwartz-Soicher, 2006. "Crime and Circumstance: The Effects of Infant Health Shocks on Fathers' Criminal Activity," NBER Working Papers 12754, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Jörg L. Spenkuch, 2014. "Understanding the Impact of Immigration on Crime," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 177-219.
    19. David Card & Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2005. "Understanding attitudes to immigration: The migration and minority module of the first European Social Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0503, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    20. Coronado, Roberto & Orrenius, Pia M., 2003. "The impact of illegal immigration and enforcement on border crime rates," Working Papers 0303, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    21. Carolyn Moehling & Anne Morrison Piehl, 2007. "Immigration and Crime in Early 20th Century America," Departmental Working Papers 200704, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    22. Brian Bell & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Immigration and crime," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 19, pages 353-372 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    23. Albert Saiz & Susan Wachter, 2011. "Immigration and the Neighborhood," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 169-188, May.
    24. George J. Borjas & Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Immigration and African-American Employment Opportunities: The Response of Wages, Employment, and Incarceration to Labor Supply Shocks," NBER Working Papers 12518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. Rauh, Alison, 2016. "Successful black immigrants narrow black–white achievement gaps," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 53-58.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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