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Childhood Exposure to Segregation and Long-Run Criminal Involvement - Evidence from the “Whole of Sweden” Strategy#

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  • Grönqvist, Hans

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

  • Niknami, Susan

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

  • Robling, P-O

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Grönqvist, Hans & Niknami, Susan & Robling, P-O, 2015. "Childhood Exposure to Segregation and Long-Run Criminal Involvement - Evidence from the “Whole of Sweden” Strategy#," Working Paper Series 1/2015, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sofiwp:2015_001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Carlsson, Magnus & Abrar Reshid, Abdulaziz & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2018. "Neighborhood Signaling Effects, Commuting Time, and Employment: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 11284, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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