IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cep/cepdps/dp1238.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales

Author

Listed:
  • Laura Jaitman
  • Stephen Machin

Abstract

We study a high profile public policy question on immigration, namely the link between crime and immigration, presenting new evidence from England and Wales in the 2000s. For studying immigration impacts, this period is of considerable interest as the composition of migration altered dramatically with the accession of Eastern European countries (the A8) to the European Union in 2004. As we show, this has important implications for ensuring a causal impact of immigration can be identified. When we are able to implement a credible research design with statistical power, we find no evidence of an average causal impact of immigration on criminal behavior, nor do we when we consider A8 and non-A8 immigration separately. We also study London by itself as the immigration changes in the capital city were very dramatic. Again, we find no causal impact of immigration on crime from our spatial econometric analysis and also present evidence from unique data on arrests of natives and immigrants which shows no immigrant differences in the likelihood of being arrested.

Suggested Citation

  • Laura Jaitman & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales," CEP Discussion Papers dp1238, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1238
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1238.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Saiz, Albert, 2007. "Immigration and housing rents in American cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 345-371, March.
    2. David Card, 2009. "Immigration and Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1-21.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5382 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    5. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
    6. Milo Bianchi & Paolo Buonanno & Paolo Pinotti, 2012. "Do Immigrants Cause Crime?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1318-1347, December.
    7. Philip J. Cook & Stephen Machin & Olivier Marie & Giovanni Mastrobuoni, 2014. "Lessons from the economics of crime," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 410, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Alan Barrett & Yvonne McCarthy, 2008. "Immigrants and welfare programmes: exploring the interactions between immigrant characteristics, immigrant welfare dependence, and welfare policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 543-560, Autumn.
    9. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Ian P. Preston, 2013. "The Effect of Immigration along the Distribution of Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 145-173.
    10. George J. Borjas & Lynette Hilton, 1996. "Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant Participation in Means-Tested Entitlement Programs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 575-604.
    11. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    12. Brian Bell & Francesco Fasani & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(4), pages 1278-1290, October.
    13. Jörg L. Spenkuch, 2014. "Understanding the Impact of Immigration on Crime," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 177-219.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. José Fernández & Matteo Pazzona, 2015. "Evaluating the Spillover Effects of the Plan Colombia in Ecuador," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/667, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Gehrsitz, Markus & Ungerer, Martin, 2016. "Jobs, cime, and votes: A short-run evaluation of the refugee crisis in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-086, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Piopiunik, Marc & Ruhose, Jens, 2017. "Immigration, regional conditions, and crime: Evidence from an allocation policy in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 258-282.
    4. Fausto Galli & Giuseppe Russo, 2013. "Immigration Restriction and Long-Run Cultural Assimilation: Theory and Quasi-Experimental Evidence," CSEF Working Papers 349, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    5. Magris, Francesco & Russo, Giuseppe, 2016. "Fiscal Revenues and Commitment in Immigration Amnesties," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 75-90.
    6. Becker, Sascha O. & Fetzer, Thiemo, "undated". "Does Migration Cause Extreme Voting?," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 306, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    7. Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2016. "Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks," IZA Discussion Papers 10304, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. World Bank Group, 2015. "Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23565, The World Bank.
    9. Tiago Freire, 2015. "City of God Redux: Inequality, Migration, and Violent Crime in Brazil between 1980 and 2000," ERSA conference papers ersa15p658, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Wassmann, Pia, 2016. "Do Open Borders Tempt a Saint? Evidence from Schengen on Crime Rates in German Border Regions," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145878, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Giuntella, Osea & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2015. "The Effects of Immigration on NHS Waiting Times," IZA Discussion Papers 9351, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. repec:eee:touman:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:383-392 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois & Gorinas, Cédric, 2017. "Democratic Involvement and Immigrants' Compliance with the Law," IZA Discussion Papers 10550, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Braakmann Nils & Wildman John & Waqas Muhammad, 2017. "Are Immigrants in Favour of Immigration? Evidence from England and Wales," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.
    15. Rosa Sanchis-Guarner, 2017. "Decomposing the Impact of Immigration on House Prices," SERC Discussion Papers 0223, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    16. Ian Preston, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Public Finances," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 569-592, November.
    17. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan, 2016. "Immigration in American Economic History," NBER Working Papers 21882, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Pia Wassmann, 2016. "Do open borders tempt a saint? Evidence from Schengen on crime rates in German border regions," ERSA conference papers ersa16p539, European Regional Science Association.
    19. Georgios Papadopoulos, 2014. "Immigration status and property crime: an application of estimators for underreported outcomes," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-30, December.
    20. Grönqvist, Hans & Niknami, Susan & Robling, P-O, 2015. "Childhood Exposure to Segregation and Long-Run Criminal Involvement - Evidence from the “Whole of Sweden” Strategy#," Working Paper Series 1/2015, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crime; Immigration; Enclaves; A8.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1238. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.