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Agricultural Outputs and Conflict Displacement: Evidence from a Policy Intervention in Rwanda

  • Florence Kondylis


    (The Earth Institute at Columbia University)

In 1997 Rwanda introduced a re-settlement policy for refugees displaced during previous conflicts. We exploit geographic variation in the speed of implementation of this policy to investigate the impact of conflict-induced displacement and the re-settlement policy on household agricultural output and on skill spill-over mechanisms between returnees and stayers. We find that returns to onfarm labour are higher for returnees relative to stayers, although the evidence suggests that the policy contributed little additional effect to this differential. More speculatively, these differentials suggest that, upon return from conflict-induced exile, returnees are more motivated to increase their economic performance.

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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 28.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:28
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