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The Economics of Forced Migration

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  • Isabel Ruiz
  • Carlos Vargas-Silva

Abstract

This article reviews the economics literature on the impacts of forced migration. The literature is divided into two parts: impacts on forced migrants and impacts on host communities. Studies exploring the impact of forced migration due to WWII suggest that the long-term impact is often positive. The literature for developing countries suggests that there are serious consequences of forced migration for those forced to migrate. These consequences range from worse labour market outcomes to less consumption smoothing. The impact on host communities seems to be mixed and there are winners and losers. The article provides suggestions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2013. "The Economics of Forced Migration," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 772-784, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:49:y:2013:i:6:p:772-784
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2013.777707
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas K. Bauer & Sebastian Braun & Michael Kvasnicka, 2013. "The Economic Integration of Forced Migrants: Evidence for Post‐War Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123, pages 998-1024, September.
    2. Braun, Sebastian & Omar Mahmoud, Toman, 2014. "The Employment Effects of Immigration: Evidence from the Mass Arrival of German Expellees in Postwar Germany," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(01), pages 69-108, March.
    3. Valentina Calderón & Ana María Ibáñez, 2005. "Labor Market Effects of Migration-Related Supply Shocks: Evidence from Internally Displaced Populations in Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 005851, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    4. Jäntti, Markus & Sarvimäki, Matti & Uusitalo, Roope, 2009. "Long-term effects of forced migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33616, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Stergios Skaperdas, 2011. "The costs of organized violence: a review of the evidence," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, March.
    6. Carlos Bozzoli & Tilman Brueck & Tony Muhumuza, 2016. "Activity Choices Of Internally Displaced Persons And Returnees: Quantitative Survey Evidence From Post-War Northern Uganda," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 329-347, October.
    7. Carlos Bozzoli & Tilman Brück, 2010. "Child Morbidity and Camp Decongestion in Post-war Uganda," Research Working Papers 24, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
    8. Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Link, Susanne, 2011. "The Evils of Forced Migration: Do Integration Policies Alleviate Migrants' Economic Situations?," IZA Discussion Papers 5829, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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