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Activity Choices of Internally Displaced Persons and Returnees: Quantitative Survey Evidence from Post-War Northern Uganda

  • Carlos Bozzoli
  • Tilman Brück
  • Tony Muhumuza

We study the effect of living in an internally displaced people's (IDP) camp on economic activity choices in post war northern Uganda. As the decision to relocate from a camp is voluntary, camp residents may be different from returnees. We merge household data with micro-level conflict data to control for endogeneity (selection of households out from camps). We find a strong effect of camp residence on activity choices. Particularly, individuals in IDP camps are more inclined to cultivate and engage in trading, than those who returned. However they are less likely to make handicrafts and participate in any of the wide range of activities. The observation that individuals living in camps strive to ensure self-reliance underscores the need for livelihood interventions and other recovery programmes to target not only returnee households but also create opportunities for households still in displacement. This should be coupled with improvement of security around camps to foster increased economic activity. Results also point to the need to fast-track infrastructure development and stimulate local demand that allows returnees to self-sustain.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.375786.de/dp1134.pdf
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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin with number 1134.

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Length: 33 p.
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1134
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  1. Nathan Fiala, 2009. "The Consequences of Forced Displacement in Northern Uganda," HiCN Working Papers 65, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Clionadh Raleigh & Andrew Linke & HÃ¥vard Hegre & Joakim Karlsen, 2010. "Introducing ACLED: An Armed Conflict Location and Event Dataset," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 47(5), pages 651-660, September.
  3. Tilman Bruck & Kati Schindler, 2009. "The Impact of Violent Conflicts on Households: What Do We Know and What Should We Know about War Widows?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 289-309.
  4. Alice Mesnard, 2009. "Migration, violence and welfare programmes in rural Colombia," IFS Working Papers W09/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Philip Verwimp & Eleonora Nillesen, 2010. "A Phoenix in Flames ?Portfolio Choice and Violence in Civil War in Rural Burundi," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2010-015, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  6. Florence Kondylis, 2007. "Agricultural Outputs and Conflict Displacement: Evidence from a Policy Intervention in Rwanda," HiCN Working Papers 28, Households in Conflict Network.
  7. Ibáñez, Ana María & Moya, Andrés, 2010. "Vulnerability of Victims of Civil Conflicts: Empirical Evidence for the Displaced Population in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 647-663, April.
  8. Kondylis, Florence, 2010. "Conflict displacement and labor market outcomes in post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 235-248, November.
  9. Patricia Justino, 2009. "The Impact of Armed Civil Conflict on Household Welfare and Policy Responses," Research Working Papers 12, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
  10. Bundervoet, Tom, 2010. "Assets, Activity Choices, and Civil War: Evidence from Burundi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 955-965, July.
  11. Patricia Justino & Philip Verwimp, 2006. "Poverty Dynamics, Violent Conflict and Convergence in Rwanda," HiCN Working Papers 16, Households in Conflict Network.
  12. Patricia Justino, 2007. "On the Links between Violent Conflict and Household Poverty: How Much Do We Really Know?," Research Working Papers 1, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
  13. Nillesen, Eleonora & Verwim, Philip, 2010. "A Phoenix in Flames? Portfolio Choice and Violence in Civil War in Rural Burundi," Working Paper Series wp2010-44, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  14. Gregory D. Hess, 2002. "The Economic Welfare Cost of Conflict: An Empirical Assessment," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-08, Claremont Colleges.
  15. Kosuke Imai & Jeremy M. Weinstein, 2000. "Measuring the Economic Impact of Civil War," CID Working Papers 51, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  16. Carlos Bozzoli & Tilman Brück, 2010. "Child Morbidity and Camp Decongestion in Post-war Uganda," Research Working Papers 24, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
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