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The Consequences of Forced Displacement in Northern Uganda

  • Nathan Fiala

    ()

    (The World Bank)

Over 21 million people are currently forced to live in internally displaced person camps around the world, the majority already from low income areas. The effect of this movement has meant a severe impact on the populations, but due to estimation and data difficulties, little is known about the impact of this movement on livelihoods and health. A data set on households and communities in a conflict zone in northern Uganda offers the opportunity to exploit a possible exogenous variation in movement and a discontinuity design in order to control for endogenous factors and thus obtain potentially unbiased estimates of the cost of movement on the people. I find that being forced to move is associated with an increase in the value of assets for households that originally had little or no assets and a decrease in the value of assets of all other households between 17% and 26%. Estimation on principal component analysis is likewise significant and suggests an even greater association. I also find that, for all income groups, displacement is associated with a decrease in the likelihood of a household consuming meat, an indicator of consumption quality and general health, of up to 71%. These two indicators suggest a possible serious long-run decrease in the economic growth potential of households as the people move home.

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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 65.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:65
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hicn.org

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  1. Ana María Ibáñez & Andrés Moya, 2006. "The Impact of Intra-State Conflict on Economic Welfare and Consumption Smoothing: Empirical Evidence for the Displaced Population in Colombia," HiCN Working Papers 23, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Guido Imbens & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Regression Discontinuity Designs: A Guide to Practice," NBER Technical Working Papers 0337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Richard Akresh & Damien de Walque, 2008. "Armed Conflict and Schooling: Evidence from the 1994 Rwandan Genocide," HiCN Working Papers 47, Households in Conflict Network.
  4. Edward Miguel & Gerard Roland, 2006. "The Long Run Impact of Bombing Vietnam," NBER Working Papers 11954, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Akresh, Richard & Verwimp, Philip & Bundervoet, Tom, 2007. "Civil war, crop failure, and child stunting in Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4208, The World Bank.
  6. Shemyakina, Olga, 2011. "The effect of armed conflict on accumulation of schooling: Results from Tajikistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 186-200, July.
  7. Florence Kondylis, 2007. "Agricultural Outputs and Conflict Displacement: Evidence from a Policy Intervention in Rwanda," HiCN Working Papers 28, Households in Conflict Network.
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