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Armed conflict and schooling : evidence from the 1994 Rwandan genocide

  • Akresh, Richard
  • de Walque, Damien

Civil war, and genocide in particular, are among the most destructive of social phenomena, especially for children of school-going age. In Rwanda school enrollment trends suggest that the school system recovered quickly after 1994, but these numbers do not tell the full story. Two cross-sectional household surveys collected before and after the genocide are used to compare children in the same age group who were and were not exposed to the genocide - and their educational outcomes are substantially different. Children exposed to the genocide experienced a drop in educational achievement of almost one-half year of completed schooling, and are 15 percentage points less likely to complete third or fourth grade. Sustained effort is needed to reinforce educational institutions and offer a"second chance"to those youth most affected by the conflict.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4606.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4606
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