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Are Composers Different? Historical Evidence on Conflict-induced Migration (1816-1997)

  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

In this paper we explore whether, and to what extent, the incidence of war affects the migration intensity of 164 prominent classical composers born after 1800. We model the aggregate stock of composers in a country and find that periods of war correspond negatively with the number of artists. We also find that conflict-induced migration intensity is considerably higher for composers than for the overall population and demonstrate that the share of composers in the overall population drops due to the incidence of war. We further find that the observed outmigration substantially diminishes the country’s creative potential in the long-run.

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File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2011/TEP0811.pdf
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Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep0811.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep0811
Contact details of provider: Postal: Trinity College, Dublin 2
Phone: (+ 353 1) 6081325
Fax: 6772503
Web page: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/

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  1. Kevin H.O'Rourke, 2006. "War and Welfare: Britain, France and the United States 1807-14," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp119, IIIS.
  2. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
  3. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  4. Ronald Findlay & Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2007. "Power and Plenty: Trade, War and the World Economy in the Second Millennium (Preface)," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp205, IIIS.
  5. Markus Jäntti & Matti Sarvimäki & Roope Uusitalo, 2009. "Long-term effects of forced migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33616, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Addison, Tony, 2006. "The International Mobility of Cultural Talent," Working Paper Series RP2006/108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. David Throsby, 1999. "Cultural Capital," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 3-12, March.
  8. Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  9. Lewis, Frank & Goldin, Claudia, 1975. "The Economic Cost of the American Civil War: Estimates and Implications," Scholarly Articles 2662305, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  10. Engel, Stefanie & Ibanez, Ana Maria, 2007. "Displacement Due to Violence in Colombia: A Household-Level Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55(2), pages 335-65, January.
  11. Florence Kondylis, 2008. "Agricultural Outputs and Conflict Displacement: Evidence from a Policy Intervention in Rwanda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(1), pages 31-66, October.
  12. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2013. "Conflict-induced migration of composers: an individual-level study," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 7(3), pages 237-266, September.
  13. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
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