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War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers

Author

Listed:
  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

  • John W. O'HAGAN

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

Abstract

The relationship between conflict and individual artistic output is ambiguous, both a priori and in terms of the evidence. To address this question in relation to composers, we employ a sample of 115 prominent classical composers born after 1800 and attempt to link their annual productivity with the incidence of wars. While the sample is small and the measure of creative productivity limited, we find evidence that the impact of wars on individual creative production is significant and negative, in keeping with the evidence on the impact of wars on overall societal creative output.

Suggested Citation

  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep1711
    as

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    File URL: https://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2011/TEP1711.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Karol BOROWIECKI & John O’HAGAN, 2012. "Historical Patterns Based on Automatically Extracted Data : The Case of Classical Composers," Historical Social Research (Section 'Cliometrics'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 37(2), pages 298-314.
    2. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
    3. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2012. "Are composers different? Historical evidence on conflict-induced migration (1816-1997)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 270-291, August.
    4. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2010. "Location matters: Estimating cluster premiums for prominent modern artists," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 199-218, February.
    5. David W. Galenson & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2000. "Age and the Quality of Work: The Case of Modern American Painters," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 761-777, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2013. "Democracy and economic outcomes: Evidence from the superstars of modern art," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 58-69.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity; conflict; war; composer;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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