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Cultural participation and tourism flows: An empirical investigation of Italian provinces

  • Borowiecki, Karol Jan


    (Department of Business and Economics)

  • Castiglione, Concetta


    (Department of Economics)

The importance of cultural events for attracting tourism has been often posited in research, however rarely tested in relation to non-cultural activities. This paper investigates the association between participation in entertainment activities and tourism flows in Italian provinces, and find that admission to theatre-type activities increases as the number of domestic tourists goes up, whereas admission to museums or concerts rises with an increase in foreign tourists. Admissions to exhibitions and shows expose a positive association with both domestic and international tourists, while non-cultural activities remain statistically insignificant. The results provide empirical support for the existence of a strong relationship between tourism flows and cultural participation. The findings also imply that the demand for entertainment varies depending on the origin of the tourist.

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Paper provided by Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark in its series Discussion Papers of Business and Economics with number 21/2012.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 29 Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sdueko:2012_021
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark
Phone: 65 50 32 33
Fax: 65 50 32 37
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  1. Seaman, Bruce A, 2006. "Empirical Studies of Demand for the Performing Arts," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "Historical Patterns Based on Automatically Extracted Data: the Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1411, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Cellini, Roberto & Torrisi, Gianpiero, 2009. "The regional public spending for tourism in Italy: An empirical analysis," MPRA Paper 16131, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Asero, Vincenzo & Patti, Sebastiano, 2009. "From Wine Production to Wine Tourism Experience: The Case of Italy," Working Papers 56206, American Association of Wine Economists.
  5. Concetta Castiglione, 2011. "The Demand for Theatre. A Microeconomic Approach to the Italian Case," Trinity Economics Papers tep0911, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  6. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
  7. Andreas Papatheodorou, 1999. "The demand for international tourism in the Mediterranean region," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(5), pages 619-630.
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This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:

  1. Cultural tourism in Wikipedia English ne '')
  2. Πολιτιστικός τουρισμός in Wikipedia Greek ne '')

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