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Spatially Disaggregated Cultural Consumption: Empirical Evidence of Cultural Sustainability from Austria

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  • Michael Getzner

    (Department of Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy, Institute of Spatial Planning, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), 1040 Vienna, Austria)

Abstract

The determinants of cultural consumption are rarely explored by means of travel demand (i.e., travel cost) models. In this paper, the empirical results are presented in regard to the frequency of attendance to cultural events as an indicator of cultural sustainability. Approximately 50% of the respondents who participated in a representative household survey in Austria stated that they would participate in cultural events at least once a year. The average frequency of attendance came to about 3 to 4 times a year, depending on the kind of cultural event (e.g., drama/opera performances, museum visits, concerts in schools of music). The estimations support the notion that the distance from the respondent’s residence to the cultural event is negatively correlated with the frequency of attendance. Other determinants include the typical socio-economic characteristics of respondents (e.g., education, income). However, the availability of cultural infrastructure in urban or rural areas, as well as municipal cultural spending, are the main spatial and public finance variables influencing attendance frequency. Based on the econometric estimations of the travel cost model, the economic value of attending a cultural event (consumer surplus) varies from EUR 38 (cinema) to EUR 55 (theater, opera) on average. The results suggest that local and regional cultural infrastructure are significant contributors to cultural sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Getzner, 2020. "Spatially Disaggregated Cultural Consumption: Empirical Evidence of Cultural Sustainability from Austria," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(23), pages 1-19, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2020:i:23:p:10023-:d:454311
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jesús Manuel De Sancha-Navarro & Juan Lara-Rubio & María Dolores Oliver-Alfonso & Luis Palma-Martos, 2021. "Cultural Sustainability in University Students’ Flamenco Music Event Attendance: A Neural Networks Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(5), pages 1-15, March.
    2. Arthur Filipe de Araújo & Maria Isabel Andrés Marques & Maria Teresa Ribeiro Candeias & Armando Luís Vieira, 2022. "Willingness to Pay for Sustainable Destinations: A Structural Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(5), pages 1-18, February.
    3. Michael Getzner, 2022. "Socio-economic and spatial determinants of municipal cultural spending," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 46(4), pages 699-722, December.

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