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The Demand for Theatre. A Microeconomic Approach to the Italian Case

  • Concetta Castiglione

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

This paper examines theatre participation in Italy over the period 1995–2006. Explanatory variables are determined by identifying their contributions to both the individual’s decision to attend, and the frequency of attendance. Socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics, cultural capital, participation in other cultural activities, ticket price and theatre supply are taken into account. Three different models are used: the logistic regression model, the ordered logistic regression model and the finite mixture model. In the first two cases the contribution of each variable is not so different, in the case of finite mixture model the significance of the variables is not the same in the two components. For instance, the variable education, a proxy for cultural capital, is always significant in determining participation, but not in frequency of participation. In general, our results show that participation is not specific to a particular theatrical event since people who attend one arts activity are more likely to attend others. Finally, our results show that traditional socio-economic variables such as income and education are highly correlated with participation in the arts.

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File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2011/TEP0911.pdf
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Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep0911.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep0911
Contact details of provider: Postal: Trinity College, Dublin 2
Phone: (+ 353 1) 6081325
Fax: 6772503
Web page: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/
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  1. John W. O'Hagan, 1996. "Access to and Participation in the Arts: The Case of Those with Low Income/Educational Attainment," Economics Policy Papers 961, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  2. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1986. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 41, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  3. Marta Zieba, 2009. "Full-income and price elasticities of demand for German public theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 85-108, May.
  4. Seaman, Bruce A, 2006. "Empirical Studies of Demand for the Performing Arts," Handbook of the Economics of Art and Culture, Elsevier.
  5. Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, 2008. "Determining heterogeneous behavior for theater attendance," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 127-151, June.
  6. Louis Lévy-Garboua & Claude Montmarquette, 2002. "The Demand for the Arts," CIRANO Working Papers 2002s-10, CIRANO.
  7. Louis Lévy-Garboua & Claude Montmarquette, 1996. "A microeconometric study of theatre demand," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 25-50, March.
  8. Victor Ginsburgh & David Throsby, 2006. "Handbook of the economics of art and culture," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/1673, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
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