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The Demand for the Arts

  • Louis Lévy-Garboua
  • Claude Montmarquette

This paper discusses the demand for the arts from a theoretical and an empirical perspectives. We suggest that the demand for the arts is price elastic and that art is a luxury good. Education, and learning experiences are also important factors affecting that demand. Ce texte traite de la demande pour les arts d'un point de vue théorique et empirique. Nous suggérons que la demande pour les arts se caractérise par une élasticité-prix relativement importante et que l'art est un bien de luxe. L'éducation et l'expérience en matière d'art jouent également un rôle important sur cette demande.

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Paper provided by CIRANO in its series CIRANO Working Papers with number 2002s-10.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 01 Feb 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cir:cirwor:2002s-10
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  1. Gapinski, James H, 1986. "The Lively Arts as Substitutes for the Lively Arts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 20-25, May.
  2. Gapinski, James H, 1984. "The Economics of Performing Shakespeare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 458-66, June.
  3. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1986. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 41, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  4. Renato Flôres & Victor Ginsburgh & Philippe Jeanfils, 1999. "Long- and Short-Term Portfolio Choices of Paintings," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 191-208, August.
  5. Richard Agnello & Renée Pierce, 1996. "Financial returns, price determinants, and genre effects in American art investment," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 359-383, December.
  6. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley, 2000. "Luxuries Are Easier to Postpone: A Proof," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 1022-1026, October.
  7. Samuel Cameron, 1999. "Rational addiction and the demand for cinema," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 617-620.
  8. Hamlen, William A, Jr, 1991. "Superstardom in Popular Music: Empirical Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 729-33, November.
  9. Arthur De Vany & W. Walls, 1999. "Uncertainty in the Movie Industry: Does Star Power Reduce the Terror of the Box Office?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 285-318, November.
  10. Louis Lévy-Garboua & Claude Montmarquette, 1996. "A microeconometric study of theatre demand," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 25-50, March.
  11. Abbe-Decarroux, Francois, 1994. "The perception of quality and the demand for services : Empirical application to the performing arts," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 99-107, January.
  12. VÍctor Blanco & JosÉ BaÑos Pino, 1997. "Cinema Demand in Spain: A Cointegration Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 57-75, March.
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