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Cinema demand in Germany

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  • Dewenter, Ralf
  • Westermann, Michael

Abstract

In the present paper we examine the German cinema market using time series data of 49 years. Applying estimation techniques such as OLS, 2SLS and SUR, we identify interrelations between the number of screens, the average real prices and the demand for movies per inhabitant. Furthermore, we test for the long run relationship and evaluate the elasticities of demand with respect to real price and income. Moreover, we analyse if cinema can be defined as an addictive good which can be explained with a myopic habit or rational addiction approach.

Suggested Citation

  • Dewenter, Ralf & Westermann, Michael, 2003. "Cinema demand in Germany," IBES Diskussionsbeiträge 125, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Business and Economic Studie (IBES).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:udewwd:125
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Perino, Grischa & Schulze, Günther G., 2003. "Competition, cultural autonomy and global governance: The audio-visual sector in Germany," HWWA Reports 232, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    2. Victor Ginsburgh & Sheila Weyers, 1999. "On the Perceived Quality of Movies," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(4), pages 269-283, November.
    3. James G. MacKinnon, 1990. "Critical Values for Cointegration Tests," Working Papers 1227, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    4. Peter Macmillan & Ian Smith, 2001. "Explaining Post-War Cinema Attendance in Great Britain," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 25(2), pages 91-108, May.
    5. Chris Hand, 2002. "The Distribution and Predictability of Cinema Admissions," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(1), pages 53-64, February.
    6. Steven Albert, 1998. "Movie Stars and the Distribution of Financially Successful Films in the Motion Picture Industry," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(4), pages 249-270, December.
    7. M. Bagella & L. Becchetti, 1999. "The Determinants of Motion Picture Box Office Performance: Evidence from Movies Produced in Italy," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(4), pages 237-256, November.
    8. Arthur De Vany & W. Walls, 1999. "Uncertainty in the Movie Industry: Does Star Power Reduce the Terror of the Box Office?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(4), pages 285-318, November.
    9. VÍctor Blanco & JosÉ BaÑos Pino, 1997. "Cinema Demand in Spain: A Cointegration Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(1), pages 57-75, March.
    10. Stock, James H, 1987. "Asymptotic Properties of Least Squares Estimators of Cointegrating Vectors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(5), pages 1035-1056, September.
    11. Samuel Cameron, 1999. "Rational addiction and the demand for cinema," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(9), pages 617-620.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cinema; demand; supply; habit formation; cointegration analysis; Seemingly Unrelated Regression;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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