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A quantitative analysis of reading habits

Author

Listed:
  • Victor Fernandez-Blanco

    () (Departamento de Economia, Facultad de Economia y Empresa, Universidad de Oviedo)

  • Juan Prieto-Rodriguez

    () (Departamento de Economia, Facultad de Economia y Empresa, Universidad de Oviedo)

  • Javier Suarez-Pandiello

    () (Departamento de Economia, Facultad de Economia y Empresa, Universidad de Oviedo)

Abstract

In this paper, reading leisure habits in Spain are analysed as part of the consumers’ decision process under a general framework of time allocation and emphasizing the role of cultural background. We use the Survey on Cultural Habits and Practices in Spain 2010-2011 to analyse the factors influencing reading habits, measured by the number of books read, and using a Zero Inflated Binomial Negative model. Time restrictions are a relevant barrier for reading habits. Female and educated people show different patterns. Furthermore, cultural attitudes and consumption are determinants of the probability of being a reader but also of the number of books read. This positive effect is linked to activities classified inside highbrow culture. Cultural capital, measured by a set of variables related to cultural home equipment that may also capture an income effect, has also a positive impact. Finally, we have also found relevant urban/rural differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez & Javier Suarez-Pandiello, 2015. "A quantitative analysis of reading habits," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-05-2015, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised May 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:cue:wpaper:awp-05-2015
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    File URL: http://www.culturaleconomics.org/awp/AWP-05-2015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marta Zieba, 2017. "Cultural participation of tourists – Evidence from travel habits of Austrian residents," Tourism Economics, , vol. 23(2), pages 295-315, March.
    2. Sara Suarez-Fernandez & Maria Jose Perez-Villadoniga & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2018. "Are We (Un)Consciously Driven by First Impressions? Price Declarations vs. Observed Cinema Demand when VAT Increases," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-02-2018, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Jul 2018.
    3. Ekaterina S. Demina & Evgeniy M. Ozhegov, 2017. "The Impact of Omnivorism on Consumer Choice: The Case of the Book Market," HSE Working papers WP BRP 175/EC/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    4. Karol J. Borowiecki & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2017. "The Cultural Value and Variety of Playing Video Games," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2017, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Jan 2017.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    reading; cultural capital; cultural habits; factorial analysis; Zero Inflated Binomial Negative model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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