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The Cultural Value and Variety of Playing Video Games

Author

Listed:
  • Karol J. Borowiecki

    () (Department of Business and Economics at University of Southern Denmark)

  • Juan Prieto-Rodriguez

    () (Departament of Economics, University of Oviedo)

Abstract

This paper compares different profiles of video game players and studies how these groups differ in their cultural consumptions patterns. By using a unique dataset on cultural participation in Denmark, we address the problem of over-aggregation and differentiate between several profiles of video gamers based on the genre they play. We find that video gamers are far from being unresponsive to other forms of cultural consumption. In fact, they rather exhibit, on average, better cultural habits than non-players. In particular, they have higher frequencies of reading, museum and performing arts attendance, and are more likely to be involved in active music participation. The exception exists for the category of reflex game players; this could be driven by age effects, since reflex games are the most popular among (males) under 40.

Suggested Citation

  • Karol J. Borowiecki & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2017. "The Cultural Value and Variety of Playing Video Games," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-01-2017, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Jan 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:cue:wpaper:awp-01-2017
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    File URL: http://www.culturaleconomics.org/awp/AWP-01-2017.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Maria Jose Perez-Villadoniga & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2016. "Looking into the Profile of Music Audiences," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-08-2016, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Jul 2016.
    2. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez & Javier Suarez-Pandiello, 2015. "A quantitative analysis of reading habits," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-05-2015, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised May 2015.
    3. Karol Borowiecki & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2015. "Video games playing: A substitute for cultural consumptions?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(3), pages 239-258, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher S. Brunt & Amanda S. King & John T. King, 2020. "The influence of user-generated content on video game demand," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 44(1), pages 35-56, March.
    2. Borowiecki, Karol J. & Bakhshi, Hasan, 2018. "Did you really take a hit? Understanding how video games playing affects individuals," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 313-326.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cultural participation; Video games;

    JEL classification:

    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature

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