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Attendance to cultural events and spousal influences: the Italian case

  • Elisabetta Lazzaro


    (University of Padua)

  • Carlofilippo Frateschi


    (University of Padua)

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    In cultural consumption it is quite reasonable to expect that the formation and the evolution of preferences, and the related individual choice behaviour, is affected by various interactions within families, peer and other social groups. Our investigation focuses on a specific form of "indirect" interaction effect, that is the reciprocal influence that a married person's preferences and characteristics can have on the cultural consumption of her/his partner. Using the last two available nationwide crosssection datasets on the leisure activities of the Italian population (ISTAT, 1995 and 2000), we estimate the mutual influence of spouses's educational and cultural background, besides other factors, on the consumption of three kinds of cultural activities, namely museum/exhibition, theatre, and opera and classical music concerts.

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    Paper provided by Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno" in its series "Marco Fanno" Working Papers with number 0084.

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    Length: 27 pages
    Date of creation: Jul 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:pad:wpaper:0084
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