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Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns

Author

Listed:
  • John O'Hagan

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI

    () (Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark
    Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

Abstract

This paper examines the 522 most important composers in the last 800 years, as identified by Murray (2003), in terms of their birth location and migration. It also looks at detailed patterns of migration and tendencies to cluster in certain cities for those composers born from 1750 to 1899. This information is compiled from the large on-line Grove encyclopaedia of Music. There is also some discussion of the biases evident in choosing ‘significant' composers. The data show a marked level of migration of important composers going back many centuries suggesting that phenomenon of globalisation had impacted on composers many centuries before its effects were more widespread. The data also show a marked level of clustering in certain cities.

Suggested Citation

  • John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep0115
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    File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2015/TEP0115.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roland Vaubel, 2005. "The Role of Competition in the Rise of Baroque and Renaissance Music," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(4), pages 277-297, November.
    2. Elish Kelly & John O’Hagan, 2007. "Geographic clustering of economic activity: The case of prominent western visual artists," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(2), pages 109-128, June.
    3. Pierre Desrochers & Frederic Sautet, 2004. "Cluster-Based Economic Strategy, Facilitation Policy and the Market Process," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 17(2_3), pages 233-245, June.
    4. John M. Quigley, 1998. "Urban Diversity and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 127-138, Spring.
    5. Sanford Ikeda, 2004. "Urban Interventionism and Local Knowledge," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 17(2_3), pages 247-264, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2013. "Geographic clustering and productivity: An instrumental variable approach for classical composers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 94-110.
    2. Karol J Borowiecki, 2015. "Agglomeration economies in classical music," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(3), pages 443-468, August.
    3. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2017. "How Are You, My Dearest Mozart? Well-Being and Creativity of Three Famous Composers Based on Their Letters," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(4), pages 591-605, July.
    4. Patrick Georges & Aylin Seçkin, 2013. "Black notes and white noise: a hedonic approach to auction prices of classical music manuscripts," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(1), pages 33-60, February.
    5. Andrej Srakar & Petja Grafenauer & Marilena Vecco, 2016. "Being Central and Productive? Evidence from Slovenian Visual Artists in the 19th and 20th Century," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-09-2016, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Sep 2016.
    6. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2012. "Are composers different? Historical evidence on conflict-induced migration (1816-1997)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 270-291, August.
    7. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2015. "Historical origins of cultural supply in Italy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 781-805.
    8. Karol Borowiecki & John O’Hagan, 2013. "Impact of war on individual life-cycle creativity: tentative evidence in relation to composers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(3), pages 347-358, August.
    9. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    10. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Castiglione, Concetta, 2012. "Cultural participation and tourism flows: An empirical investigation of Italian provinces," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 21/2012, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    11. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Kavetsos, Georgios, 2015. "In fatal pursuit of immortal fame: Peer competition and early mortality of music composers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 30-42.
    12. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & Georgios KAVETSOS, 2011. "Does Competition Kill? The Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1111, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    13. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Conflict-induced Migration of Composers: An Individual-level Study," Trinity Economics Papers tep0511, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    composers; geographic concentration; labour mobility; migration;

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