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Geographic clustering of economic activity: The case of prominent western visual artists

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  • Elish Kelly
  • John O’Hagan

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Abstract

This article compiles original data relating to artists’ place of birth and work migration patterns using various art history dictionaries. The broad historic pattern, from the 13th to the 20th century, of the birth locations of prominent artists is examined, followed by a detailed study of the work migration patterns of prominent artists in two important situations, namely Renaissance Italy and France in part of the 19th century. The evidence indicates a marked clustering of activity of prominent artists, both arising from birth location and migration patterns. Some possible explanations for the observed patterns are briefly outlined. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Elish Kelly & John O’Hagan, 2007. "Geographic clustering of economic activity: The case of prominent western visual artists," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(2), pages 109-128, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:31:y:2007:i:2:p:109-128
    DOI: 10.1007/s10824-007-9035-x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10824-007-9035-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roland Vaubel, 2005. "The Role of Competition in the Rise of Baroque and Renaissance Music," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(4), pages 277-297, November.
    2. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1996. "R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 630-640, June.
    3. David W. Galenson, 1999. "Quantifying Artistic Success: Ranking French Painters - and Paintings - from Impressionism to Cubism," NBER Working Papers 7407, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. David W. Galenson & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2000. "Age and the Quality of Work: The Case of Modern American Painters," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 761-777, August.
    5. David W. Galenson & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2001. "Creating Modern Art: The Changing Careers of Painters in France from Impressionism to Cubism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1063-1071, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
    2. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2009. "Artistic styles: revisiting the analysis of modern artists’ careers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(3), pages 201-232, August.
    3. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2013. "Geographic clustering and productivity: An instrumental variable approach for classical composers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 94-110.
    4. repec:spr:homoec:v:34:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s41412-016-0033-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sibelle Diniz & Ana Machado, 2011. "Analysis of the consumption of artistic-cultural goods and services in Brazil," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(1), pages 1-18, February.
    6. Cartigny, Pierre & Champarnaud, Luc, 2013. "A dynamic game for fiscal federalism with non-local externalities," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 328-335.
    7. Christiane Hellmanzik, Department of Economics and IIIS, Trinity College Dublin, 2009. "Artistic Clusters and Modern Artists’ Mobility - An Empirical Study," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp296, IIIS.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Artists; Migration; Clustering; Z10;

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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