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John O'Hagan

Personal Details

First Name:John
Middle Name:
Last Name:O'Hagan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:poh40
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Affiliation

Trinity Research in Social Studies (TRiSS)
Trinity College Dublin

Dublin, Ireland
http://www.tcd.ie/triss/
RePEc:edi:cetcdie (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "Historical Patterns Based on Automatically Extracted Data: the Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1411, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Clare McAndrew & John O'Hagan, 2000. "Export Restrictions, Tax Incentives and the National Artistic Patrimony," Trinity Economics Papers 20006, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  4. John O'Hagan & Clare McAndrew, 2000. "'Protecting' the National Artistic Patrimony; An Economics Perspective," Trinity Economics Papers 20007, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  5. John W. O'Hagan, 1997. "Taxation and the Consumption of Tobacco," Economics Policy Papers 972, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  6. John W. O'Hagan, 1996. "Access to and Participation in the Arts: The Case of Those with Low Income/Educational Attainment," Economics Policy Papers 961, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  7. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "National Museums: To Charge or not to charge?," Economics Policy Papers 952, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  8. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "Dublin Theatre: An Economic Analysis of the Abbey Theatre," Economics Policy Papers 951, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Zieba Marta & O’Hagan John, 2013. "Demand for Live Orchestral Music – The Case of German Kulturorchester," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(2), pages 225-245, April.
  2. John O’Hagan & Marta Zieba, 2010. "Output Characteristics and Other Determinants of Theatre Attendance--An Econometric Analysis of German Data," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 56(2), pages 147-174.
  3. Elish Kelly & John O’Hagan, 2007. "Geographic clustering of economic activity: The case of prominent western visual artists," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(2), pages 109-128, June.
  4. John O’Hagan, 2007. "Simon Roodhouse, Cultural Quarters: Principles and Practice," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(2), pages 163-165, June.
  5. John O’Hagan & Adriana Neligan, 2005. "State Subsidies and Repertoire Conventionality in the Non-Profit English Theatre Sector: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(1), pages 35-57, February.
  6. John O'Hagan, 2003. "Stato e arte: la cassetta degli attrezzi," Economia della Cultura, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 19-32.
  7. John O'Hagan & Michael Jennings, 2003. "Public Broadcasting in Europe: Rationale, Licence Fee and Other Issues," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 27(1), pages 31-56, February.
  8. John O'Hagan, 2002. "Gigi Bradford, Michael Gary and Glenn Wallach (eds.), The Politics of Culture – Policy Perspectives for Individuals, Institutions, and Communities," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(2), pages 161-163, May.
  9. John O'Hagan & Denice Harvey, 2000. "Why Do Companies Sponsor Arts Events? Some Evidence and a Proposed Classification," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 24(3), pages 205-224, August.
  10. John O'hagan, 1998. "Art Museums: Collections, Deaccessioning and Donations," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(2), pages 197-207, June.
  11. John O’Hagan, 1996. "Access to and participation in the arts: The case of those with low incomes/educational attainment," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(4), pages 269-282, December.
  12. O'Hagan, John W & McCabe, Brendan, 1975. "Tests for the Severity of Multicollinearity in Regression Analysis: A Comment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 368-370, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "National Museums: To Charge or not to charge?," Economics Policy Papers 952, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Théorie économique des musées in Wikipedia (French)

Working papers

  1. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "Historical Patterns Based on Automatically Extracted Data: the Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1411, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Karol Jan Borowiecki & Concetta Castiglione, 2014. "Cultural Participation and Tourism Flows: An Empirical Investigation of Italian Provinces," Tourism Economics, , vol. 20(2), pages 241-262, April.
    2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Geographic Clustering and Productivity: An Instrumental Variable Approach for Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep0611, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    3. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Dahl, Christian Møller, 2021. "What makes an artist? The evolution and clustering of creative activity in the US since 1850," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    4. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Graddy, Kathryn, 2019. "Immigrant Artists: Enrichment or Displacement?," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 4/2019, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    5. Borowiecki, Karol J., 2013. "Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 13/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    6. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2015. "Historical origins of cultural supply in Italy," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 3/2015, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    7. Karol Jan BOROWIECKi & Concetta CASTIGLIONE, 2012. "Cultural Participation and Tourism Flows in Italy," Trinity Economics Papers tep0212, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    8. Karol Borowiecki & John O’Hagan, 2013. "Impact of war on individual life-cycle creativity: tentative evidence in relation to composers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(3), pages 347-358, August.
    9. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2013. "Democracy and economic outcomes: Evidence from the superstars of modern art," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 58-69.

  3. Clare McAndrew & John O'Hagan, 2000. "Export Restrictions, Tax Incentives and the National Artistic Patrimony," Trinity Economics Papers 20006, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Victor Ginsburgh & François Mairesse, 2013. "Issues in the international market for cultural heritage," Chapters, in: Ilde Rizzo & Anna Mignosa (ed.), Handbook on the Economics of Cultural Heritage, chapter 7, pages i-i, Edward Elgar Publishing.

  4. John W. O'Hagan, 1996. "Access to and Participation in the Arts: The Case of Those with Low Income/Educational Attainment," Economics Policy Papers 961, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Getzner, 2002. "Determinants of Public Cultural Expenditures: An Exploratory Time Series Analysis for Austria," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(4), pages 287-306, November.
    2. Volker Kirchberg, 1998. "Entrance Fees as a Subjective Barrier to Visiting Museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(1), pages 1-13, March.
    3. Werck, Kristien & Heyndels, Bruno & Geys, Benny, 2007. "The impact of central places on spatial spending patterns: evidence from Flemish local government cultural expenditures [Der Einfluss ‘Zentraler Orte’ auf räumliche Ausgabenmuster: eine empirische ," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Processes and Governance SP II 2007-10, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    4. Juan Prieto-Rodríguez & Víctor Fernández-Blanco, 2000. "Are Popular and Classical Music Listeners the Same People?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 24(2), pages 147-164, May.
    5. Luis Antonio Palma M. & Luis Fernando Aguado Q., 2010. "Economía de la cultura. Una nueva área de especialización de la economía," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 12(22), pages 129-165, January-J.
    6. Juan Montoro-Pons & Manuel Cuadrado-García, 2011. "Live and prerecorded popular music consumption," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(1), pages 19-48, February.
    7. Bonet, Lluís & Villarroya, Anna, 2009. "La estructura de mercado del sector de las artes escénicas en España/," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 27, pages 199-224, Abril.
    8. Concetta Castiglione, 2011. "The Demand for Theatre. A Microeconomic Approach to the Italian Case," Trinity Economics Papers tep0911, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    9. Lunn, Pete & Kelly, Elish, 2009. "Accounting for Taste: An Examination of Socioeconomic Gradients in Attendance at Arts Events," Papers WP283, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

  5. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "National Museums: To Charge or not to charge?," Economics Policy Papers 952, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Juan Prieto-Rodríguez & Víctor Fernández-Blanco, 2006. "Optimal pricing and grant policies for museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(3), pages 169-181, December.
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Stephan Meier, "undated". "The Economics of Museums," IEW - Working Papers 149, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Volker Kirchberg, 1998. "Entrance Fees as a Subjective Barrier to Visiting Museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(1), pages 1-13, March.
    4. de Frutos, Pablo & Rodriguez-Prado, Beatriz & Latorre, Joaquín & Martinez-Peña, Fernando, 2019. "A Gravity Model to Explain Flows of Wild Edible Mushroom Picking. A Panel Data Analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 164-173.
    5. Muzychuk, V. & Khaunina, E., 2015. "Support Mechanisms for Museums in the Economic Crisis (the Example of Major Museums of Europe and Russia)," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 132-161.
    6. Marine Le Gall-Ely & Caroline Urbain & Anne Gombault & Dominique Bourgeon & Christine Petr, 2007. "Une étude exploratoire des représentations de la gratuité et de ses effets sur le comportement des publics des musées et des monuments," Post-Print hal-00522834, HAL.
    7. William Luksetich & Mark Partridge, 1997. "Demand functions for museum services," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(12), pages 1553-1559.
    8. David Maddison, 2004. "Causality and Museum Subsidies," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 28(2), pages 89-108, May.
    9. Bruno Frey, 1998. "Superstar Museums: An Economic Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(2), pages 113-125, June.

  6. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "Dublin Theatre: An Economic Analysis of the Abbey Theatre," Economics Policy Papers 951, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Trine Hansen, 1997. "The Willingness-to-Pay for the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen as a Public Good," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(1), pages 1-28, March.

Articles

  1. Zieba Marta & O’Hagan John, 2013. "Demand for Live Orchestral Music – The Case of German Kulturorchester," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(2), pages 225-245, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Marta Zieba, 2017. "Cultural participation of tourists – Evidence from travel habits of Austrian residents," Tourism Economics, , vol. 23(2), pages 295-315, March.
    2. Mafalda Gómez-Vega & Luis César Herrero-Prieto, 2019. "Measuring emotion through quality: evaluating the musical repertoires of Spanish symphony orchestras," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 43(2), pages 211-245, June.
    3. Concetta Castiglione, 2019. "Revealed individual attendance at Italian theatre: a microeconomic investigation," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(3), pages 731-759, October.
    4. Achten-Gozdowski, Jennifer, 2018. "Geschichte und Politökonomie deutscher Theatersubventionen [History and Political Economy of Public Subsidies for German Theatres and Operas]," MPRA Paper 85087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Junlong Wu & Keshen Jiang & Chaoqing Yuan, 2019. "Determinants of demand for traditional Chinese opera," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(6), pages 2129-2148, December.
    6. Vincent G. Munley, 2018. "A Contingent Valuation Analysis of the Galway City Museum: Welfare Estimates for Attendance in the Absence of an Admission Fee," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 49(4), pages 489-514.

  2. John O’Hagan & Marta Zieba, 2010. "Output Characteristics and Other Determinants of Theatre Attendance--An Econometric Analysis of German Data," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 56(2), pages 147-174.

    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Wiśniewska, 2019. "‘Quality food’ for cultural policies. Quality attributes in the non-market stated-preference based valuation of cultural goods," Working Papers 2019-03, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Ana Rodriguez-Alvarez & Aleksandra Wisniewska, 2017. "Measuring Technical Efficiency and Marginal Costs in the Performing Arts: The Case of the Municipal Theatres of Warsaw," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-09-2017, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Oct 2017.
    3. Jose A Bermudez Trivino & Lina M Medina Hurtado & Luis Fernando Aguado Quintero, 2015. "Analyzing the decision to listen to recorded music. A microeconometric approach," Working Papers 3, Faculty of Economics and Management, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali.
    4. Bermúdez Triviño, José A. & Medina Hurtado, Lina M. & Aguado Quintero, Luis F., 2016. "La decisión de escuchar música grabada en Colombia. Un enfoque microeconométrico || The decision of listening to recorded music in Colombia. A microeconometric approach," Revista de Métodos Cuantitativos para la Economía y la Empresa = Journal of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, vol. 21(1), pages 21-38, June.
    5. Zieba Marta & O’Hagan John, 2013. "Demand for Live Orchestral Music – The Case of German Kulturorchester," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 233(2), pages 225-245, April.
    6. Wiśniewska Aleksandra, 2019. "Quality attributes in the non-market stated-preference based valuation of cultural goods," Central European Economic Journal, Sciendo, vol. 6(53), pages 132-150, January.
    7. Marta Zieba, 2011. "An Analysis of Technical Efficiency and Efficiency Factors for Austrian and Swiss Non-Profit Theatres," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 147(II), pages 233-274, June.
    8. Concetta Castiglione, 2019. "Revealed individual attendance at Italian theatre: a microeconomic investigation," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(3), pages 731-759, October.
    9. Achten-Gozdowski, Jennifer, 2018. "Geschichte und Politökonomie deutscher Theatersubventionen [History and Political Economy of Public Subsidies for German Theatres and Operas]," MPRA Paper 85087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Junlong Wu & Keshen Jiang & Chaoqing Yuan, 2019. "Determinants of demand for traditional Chinese opera," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(6), pages 2129-2148, December.
    11. Vincent G. Munley, 2018. "A Contingent Valuation Analysis of the Galway City Museum: Welfare Estimates for Attendance in the Absence of an Admission Fee," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 49(4), pages 489-514.
    12. Marta Zieba & Carol Newman, 2012. "Organisational Structure and Managerial Efficiency: A quasi-experimental analysis of German public theatres," Working Papers WP032012, University of Limerick, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2012.
    13. Jani-Petri Laamanen, 2013. "Estimating demand for opera using sales system data: the case of Finnish National Opera," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(4), pages 417-432, November.

  3. Elish Kelly & John O’Hagan, 2007. "Geographic clustering of economic activity: The case of prominent western visual artists," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(2), pages 109-128, June.

    Cited by:

    1. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
    2. Douglas J. Hodgson & Christiane Hellmanzik, 2019. "Relationships between artistic movements and careers of modern artists: evidence from hedonic regressions with auction data," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 43(2), pages 309-337, June.
    3. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Geographic Clustering and Productivity: An Instrumental Variable Approach for Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep0611, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    4. Cartigny, Pierre & Champarnaud, Luc, 2013. "A dynamic game for fiscal federalism with non-local externalities," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 328-335.
    5. Christiane Hellmanzik, Department of Economics and IIIS, Trinity College Dublin, 2009. "Artistic Clusters and Modern Artists’ Mobility - An Empirical Study," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp296, IIIS.
    6. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2009. "Artistic styles: revisiting the analysis of modern artists’ careers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(3), pages 201-232, August.
    7. John O’Hagan & Alan Walsh, 2017. "Historical Migration and Geographic Clustering of Prominent Western Philosophers," Homo Oeconomicus: Journal of Behavioral and Institutional Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 11-32, April.
    8. Sibelle Diniz & Ana Machado, 2011. "Analysis of the consumption of artistic-cultural goods and services in Brazil," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(1), pages 1-18, February.

  4. John O’Hagan & Adriana Neligan, 2005. "State Subsidies and Repertoire Conventionality in the Non-Profit English Theatre Sector: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(1), pages 35-57, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Juan José Price Elton, 2016. "Racionalidad económica de la política cultural," Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(144), pages 165-197.
    2. Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2011. "Theatre," Chapters, in: Ruth Towse (ed.), A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 59, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Ana Rodriguez-Alvarez & Aleksandra Wisniewska, 2017. "Measuring Technical Efficiency and Marginal Costs in the Performing Arts: The Case of the Municipal Theatres of Warsaw," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-09-2017, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Oct 2017.
    4. A. Collins & A. E. Scorcu & R. Zanola, 2008. "Distribution Conventionality in the Movie Sector: An Econometric Analysis of Cinema Supply," Working Papers 639, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Mafalda Gómez-Vega & Luis César Herrero-Prieto, 2019. "Measuring emotion through quality: evaluating the musical repertoires of Spanish symphony orchestras," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 43(2), pages 211-245, June.
    6. Kristien Werck & Bruno Heyndels, 2007. "Programmatic choices and the demand for theatre: the case of Flemish theatres," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(1), pages 25-41, March.
    7. Achten-Gozdowski, Jennifer, 2018. "Geschichte und Politökonomie deutscher Theatersubventionen [History and Political Economy of Public Subsidies for German Theatres and Operas]," MPRA Paper 85087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Gałecka Małgorzata & Smolny Katarzyna, 2019. "Criteria for the optimal financing model of public theatres," Review of Economic Perspectives, Sciendo, vol. 19(2), pages 119-136, June.
    9. Jeffrey Pompe & Lawrence Tamburri & Johnathan Munn, 2011. "Factors that influence programming decisions of US symphony orchestras," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(3), pages 167-184, August.
    10. William A Luksetich, 2011. "Orchestras," Chapters, in: Ruth Towse (ed.), A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 44, Edward Elgar Publishing.

  5. John O'Hagan & Michael Jennings, 2003. "Public Broadcasting in Europe: Rationale, Licence Fee and Other Issues," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 27(1), pages 31-56, February.

    Cited by:

    1. M. van Dijk & R. Nahuis & D. Waagmeester, 2005. "Does Public Service Broadcasting Serve the Public? The Future of Television in the Changing Media Landscape," Working Papers 05-13, Utrecht School of Economics.
    2. Liam Delaney & Francis O'Toole, 2004. "Irish public service broadcasting : a contingent valuation analysis," Open Access publications 10197/584, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Frederick Van der Ploeg, 2005. "The Making of Cultural Policy: A European Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 1524, CESifo.
    4. Paul Fenn & David Paton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2009. "Productivity growth and funding of public service broadcasting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(3), pages 335-349, December.
    5. Bernd Huber & Marco Runkel, 2004. "Tax Competition, Excludable Public Goods and User Charges," CESifo Working Paper Series 1172, CESifo.
    6. Richard Wurff, 2005. "Competition, Concentration and Diversity in European Television Markets," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(4), pages 249-275, November.
    7. Perino, Grischa & Schulze, Gunther G., 2003. "Competition, Cultural Autonomy and Global Governance: The Audio-Visual Sector in Germany," Report Series 26099, Hamburg Institute of International Economics.

  6. John O'Hagan & Denice Harvey, 2000. "Why Do Companies Sponsor Arts Events? Some Evidence and a Proposed Classification," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 24(3), pages 205-224, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Luigi Dolores & Maria Macchiaroli & Gianluigi De Mare, 2020. "A Dynamic Model for the Financial Sustainability of the Restoration Sponsorship," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(4), pages 1-27, February.
    2. Björn Frank & Kurt Geppert, 2004. "Are Small Recipients Overlooked by Sponsors? An Empirical Note," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 28(2), pages 143-156, May.
    3. Bennett, Roger & Sargeant, Adrian, 2005. "The nonprofit marketing landscape: guest editors' introduction to a special section," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(6), pages 797-805, June.
    4. Yijing Wang & Kaspar-Pascal Holznagel, 2021. "Evolving Cross-Sector Collaboration in the Arts and Culture Sector: From Sponsorship to Partnership," Corporate Reputation Review, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 24(2), pages 95-104, May.
    5. Ailian Gan, 2006. "The Impact of Public Scrutiny on Corporate Philanthropy," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 69(3), pages 217-236, December.
    6. Björn Frank & Kurt Geppert, 2002. "Corporate Donations to the Arts: Philanthropy or Advertising?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 307, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Julia Hiscock & David E. Hojman, 2004. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone? Coase Theorem Failures in English Summer Cultural Events: The Case of Sidmouth International Festival," Working Papers 200406, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    8. Christian Peukert, 2019. "The next wave of digital technological change and the cultural industries," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 43(2), pages 189-210, June.
    9. Scherer, F. M., 2007. "Corporate Structure and the Financial Support of U.S. Symphony Orchestras," Working Paper Series rwp07-002, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    10. John O'Hagan & Clare McAndrew, 2000. "'Protecting' the National Artistic Patrimony; An Economics Perspective," Trinity Economics Papers 20007, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    11. Arthur Gautier & Anne-Claire Pache, 2015. "Research on Corporate Philanthropy: A Review and Assessment," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 343-369, February.
    12. Justin Tan & Yuejun Tang, 2016. "Donate Money, but Whose? An Empirical Study of Ultimate Control Rights, Agency Problems, and Corporate Philanthropy in China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 134(4), pages 593-610, April.
    13. Hojman, David E. & Hiscock, Julia, 2010. "Interpreting suboptimal business outcomes in light of the Coase Theorem: Lessons from Sidmouth International Festival," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 240-249.
    14. Hou, Deshuai & Meng, Qingbin & Zhang, Kai & Chan, Kam C., 2019. "Motives for corporate philanthropy propensity: Does short selling matter?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 24-36.

  7. John O'hagan, 1998. "Art Museums: Collections, Deaccessioning and Donations," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(2), pages 197-207, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruno S. Frey & Stephan Meier, "undated". "The Economics of Museums," IEW - Working Papers 149, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    2. Bruno S. Frey & Lasse Steiner, 2010. "Pay as You Go: A New Proposal for Museum Pricing," CREMA Working Paper Series 2010-10, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Bruno S. Frey & Stephan Meier, "undated". "Museums between Private and Public - The Case of the Beyeler Museum in Basle," IEW - Working Papers 116, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Muzychuk, V. & Khaunina, E., 2015. "Support Mechanisms for Museums in the Economic Crisis (the Example of Major Museums of Europe and Russia)," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 132-161.

  8. John O’Hagan, 1996. "Access to and participation in the arts: The case of those with low incomes/educational attainment," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(4), pages 269-282, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  9. O'Hagan, John W & McCabe, Brendan, 1975. "Tests for the Severity of Multicollinearity in Regression Analysis: A Comment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 368-370, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Valmor Comim Junior, 2021. "Literature review on Drivers of Chinese Outward Foreign Direct Investment," International Journal of Science and Business, IJSAB International, vol. 5(4), pages 143-157.
    2. David A. Belsley, 1976. "Multicollinearity: Diagnosing its Presence and Assessing the Potential Damage It Causes Least Squares Estimation," NBER Working Papers 0154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jørgen Lauridsen & Jesùs Mur, 2006. "Multicollinearity in cross-sectional regressions," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 317-333, October.
    4. Emilian Dobrescu, 2018. "Functional trinity of public finance in an emerging economy," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 7(1), pages 1-27, December.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-10-22
  2. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (1) 2011-10-22
  3. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2011-11-01
  4. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2011-10-22

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