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Entrance Fees as a Subjective Barrier to Visiting Museums


  • Volker Kirchberg


In a 1995 representative survey, 1,080 Germans were asked by standardized questionnaire to assess the subjective significance of 23 motives and barriers to visiting art museums, history museums and technology museums on a scale from 1 (very unimportant motive/barrier) to 5 (very important motive/barrier). An analysis of the results of the survey revealed entrance fees to be the only significant subjective barrier. In contrast to recent price elasticity studies of cultural demand, this study uses a micro-level approach – comparing individual socioeconomic and geographic characteristics with individual and subjective assessments of museum entrance fees as a barrier. The results of an ordered-probit analysis suggest income to be the only significant individual characteristic which can explain this subjective assessment. However, using correspondence analysis, several other individual characteristics such as education and professional status also appear to have a relative impact on the subjective assessment of entrance fees. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Suggested Citation

  • Volker Kirchberg, 1998. "Entrance Fees as a Subjective Barrier to Visiting Museums," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 22(1), pages 1-13, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:22:y:1998:i:1:p:1-13
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1007452808105

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John O’Hagan, 1996. "Access to and participation in the arts: The case of those with low incomes/educational attainment," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 20(4), pages 269-282, December.
    2. Michael Greenacre, 2008. "Correspondence analysis of raw data," Economics Working Papers 1112, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2009.
    3. John W. O'Hagan, 1995. "National Museums: To Charge or not to charge?," Economics Policy Papers 952, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    4. William Luksetich & Mark Partridge, 1997. "Demand functions for museum services," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(12), pages 1553-1559.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno S. Frey & Lasse Steiner, 2010. "Pay as you go: a new proposal for museum pricing," IEW - Working Papers 485, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    2. Mazzanti, Massimiliano, 2003. "Valuing cultural heritage in a multi-attribute framework microeconomic perspectives and policy implications," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 549-569, November.
    3. Cellini, Roberto & Cuccia, Tiziana, 2017. "How free admittance affects charged visits to museums: An analysis of the Italian case," MPRA Paper 78067, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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