IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Programmatic choices and the demand for theatre: the case of Flemish theatres

  • Kristien Werck

    ()

  • Bruno Heyndels
Registered author(s):

    Theatre experts generally agree that the Flemish theatre has flourished artistically over the period 1980–2000. Attendance, on the other hand, has declined significantly. Following Lancaster’s characteristics approach, we identify several output characteristics of individual theatre productions. Using a panel of 59 Flemish theatres, we examine the impact on demand of both these output characteristics and of traditional determinants such as own price, income and the price of substitutes. Differences in the relevant geographical market for touring and non-touring theatres are considered. We find that the nature of the artistic output affects demand. Theatregoers prefer large productions (in terms of cast size), plays by Dutch-speaking playwrights and revivals of old productions. Own price and consumer income have the expected negative and positive effects on attendance. Observed trends toward a decreasing proportion of new plays, an increasing presence of plays by Dutch-speaking playwrights, and increasing consumer income had a stimulating effect on attendance. These trends have been offset, however, by trends toward smaller cast sizes and higher ticket prices as well as by unobserved factors captured by time dummies. The net result has been a considerable drop in attendance. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10824-006-9026-3
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Cultural Economics.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 25-41

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:31:y:2007:i:1:p:25-41
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100284

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. J. Pierce, 2000. "Programmatic Risk-Taking by American Opera Companies," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 45-63, February.
    2. John O’Hagan & Adriana Neligan, 2005. "State Subsidies and Repertoire Conventionality in the Non-Profit English Theatre Sector: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 35-57, February.
    3. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521637121 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gapinski, James H, 1986. "The Lively Arts as Substitutes for the Lively Arts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 20-25, May.
    5. Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2002. "Quality Judgements and Demand for French Public Theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 185-202, August.
    6. Revelli, Federico, 2003. "Reaction or interaction? Spatial process identification in multi-tiered government structures," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 29-53, January.
    7. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
    8. Gapinski, James H, 1984. "The Economics of Performing Shakespeare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 458-66, June.
    9. Throsby, David, 1994. "The Production and Consumption of the Arts: A View of Cultural Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-29, March.
    10. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
    11. Jonathan Corning & Armando Levy, 2002. "Demand for Live Theater with Market Segmentation and Seasonality," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 217-235, August.
    12. Jenkins, Stephen & Austen-Smith, David, 1987. "Interdependent decision-making in non-profit industries: A simultaneous equation analysis of English provincial theatre," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 149-174.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:31:y:2007:i:1:p:25-41. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn)

    or (Christopher F. Baum)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.