IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/13789_59.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Theatre

In: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Urrutiaguer

Abstract

The second edition of this widely acclaimed and extensively cited collection of original contributions by specialist authors reflects changes in the field of cultural economics over the last eight years. Thoroughly revised chapters alongside new topics and contributors bring the Handbook up to date, taking into account new research, literature and the impact of new technologies in the creative industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2011. "Theatre," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 59 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13789_59
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848448872.00065.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kristien Werck & Bruno Heyndels, 2007. "Programmatic choices and the demand for theatre: the case of Flemish theatres," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(1), pages 25-41, March.
    2. N/A, 1985. "Summary and Appraisal," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 113(1), pages 3-4, August.
    3. N/A, 1985. "Summary and Appraisal," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 111(1), pages 3-4, February.
    4. Marta Zieba, 2009. "Full-income and price elasticities of demand for German public theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(2), pages 85-108, May.
    5. Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, 2008. "Determining heterogeneous behavior for theater attendance," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 32(2), pages 127-151, June.
    6. Stefan Tobias, 2004. "Quality in the Performing Arts: Aggregating and Rationalizing Expert Opinion," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 28(2), pages 109-124, May.
    7. N/A, 1985. "Summary and Appraisal," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 114(1), pages 3-5, November.
    8. John O’Hagan & Adriana Neligan, 2005. "State Subsidies and Repertoire Conventionality in the Non-Profit English Theatre Sector: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(1), pages 35-57, February.
    9. N/A, 1985. "Summary and Appraisal," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 112(1), pages 3-4, May.
    10. Mervi Taalas, 1997. "Generalised Cost Functions for Producers of Performing Arts – Allocative Inefficiencies and Scale Economies in Theatres," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(4), pages 335-353, December.
    11. Xavier Castañer & Lorenzo Campos, 2002. "The Determinants of Artistic Innovation: Bringing in the Role of Organizations," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(1), pages 29-52, February.
    12. Sacit Akdede & John King, 2006. "Demand for and productivity analysis of Turkish public theater," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 30(3), pages 219-231, December.
    13. Throsby, David, 1994. "The Production and Consumption of the Arts: A View of Cultural Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-29, March.
    14. Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2002. "Quality Judgements and Demand for French Public Theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(3), pages 185-202, August.
    15. David Maddison, 2005. "Are There Too Many Revivals on Broadway? A Stochastic Dominance Approach," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(4), pages 325-334, November.
    16. Jonathan Corning & Armando Levy, 2002. "Demand for Live Theater with Market Segmentation and Seasonality," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(3), pages 217-235, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13789_59. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.