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Conflict-induced migration of composers: an individual-level study

  • Karol Jan Borowiecki

    ()

    (Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark & Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.)

Research on the causes of conflict-induced migration is hindered by the lack of adequately disaggregated data. The underlying study overcomes this problem through the use of historical data on 164 prominent classical composers born after 1800. I analyze the impact of war on the probability to emigrate of composers, investigate the associated dynamics and shed light on the choice of a destination country in times of war. I find that the incidence of inter-state wars increases composers’ probability to emigrate by around 7 % and the incidence of intra-state wars by roughly 19 %. The results imply that conflict impacts the migration intensity with a lag of approximately 1 year. Furthermore, the choice of a destination country is significantly affected by the incidence of war and less efficient from a career’s point of view during war. Finally, I find heterogeneous responses to war based on individual’s quality. While the better composers are more likely to emigrate in times of peace, it is not so anymore if a war breaks out. In times of war, all artists are affected by war and are prone to emigrate.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11698-012-0087-6
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Article provided by Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC) in its journal Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History.

Volume (Year): 7 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 237-266

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Handle: RePEc:afc:cliome:v:7:y:2013:i:3:p:237-266
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.cliometrie.org

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  1. Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2006. "War and Welfare: Britain, France and the United States 1807-14," Trinity Economics Papers tep2008, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Geographic Clustering and Productivity: An Instrumental Variable Approach for Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep0611, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2012. "Are composers different? Historical evidence on conflict-induced migration (1816-1997)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 270-291, August.
  4. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
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