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Does Competition Kill? The Case of Classical Composers

  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

  • Georgios KAVETSOS

    ()

    (Cass Business School, City University, London)

We investigate the impact of peer competition on longevity using a unique historical data set of classical composers. We measure the geographic concentration of peers by the number of composers located in the same area and the time spent in one of the main geographic clusters for classical music. Using instrumental variables, we find a significant negative effect of geographic concentration. An additional composer based in the same location decreases longevity by 2.3 years, on average. Besides the widely known economic benefits associated with competition, these findings suggest that significant negative welfare externalities exist as well.

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File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2011/TEP1111.pdf
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Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep1111.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep1111
Contact details of provider: Postal: Trinity College, Dublin 2
Phone: (+ 353 1) 6081325
Fax: 6772503
Web page: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/

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  25. John O'Hagan & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2009. "Birth Location, Migration and Clustering of Important Composers: Historical Patterns," Trinity Economics Papers tep0115, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
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