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Health and social inequities in Finland and elsewhere

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  • Lahelma, Eero
  • Valkonen, Tapani

Abstract

This review summarizes results of a number of studies on health and social inequities in Finland in comparison with other countries. Comparisons over time have been made when possible. Inequities in mortality in Finland can be compared with data from Denmark, Norway and Sweden as well as England and Wales plus Hungary. All countries show a similar relationship between mortality and level of education. No major changes in this relationship can be observed during the 1970s. Data on morbidity and perceived health complete the picture obtained on the basis of mortality data. Inequities concern various dimensions of health. Taken as a whole, the data suggest that the pattern of health inequities is more accentuated in Finland than in other Nordic countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Lahelma, Eero & Valkonen, Tapani, 1990. "Health and social inequities in Finland and elsewhere," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 257-265, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:31:y:1990:i:3:p:257-265
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher J. Boyce & Andrew J. Oswald, 2012. "Do people become healthier after being promoted?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(5), pages 580-596, May.
    2. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & Bleichrodt, Han & Calonge, Samuel & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna & Hakkinen, Unto & Leu, Robert E., 1997. "Income-related inequalities in health: some international comparisons," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 93-112, February.
    3. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew, 2004. "How is mortality affected by money, marriage, and stress?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1181-1207, November.
    4. Norbert Donner-Banzhoff & Lothar Kreienbrock & Marko Katic, 1998. "Family practitioners' remuneration and patterns of care — does social class matter?," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 43(2), pages 73-79, March.
    5. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Kavetsos, Georgios, 2015. "In fatal pursuit of immortal fame: Peer competition and early mortality of music composers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 30-42.
    6. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & Georgios KAVETSOS, 2011. "Does Competition Kill? The Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1111, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    7. Molnár, D. László & Hollósné Marosi, Judit, 2015. "Az öregségi nyugdíjasok halandósága. A nyugellátási összeg, a nyugdíjazási életkor és a halandóság összefüggései Magyarországon, 2004-2012
      [Mortality of old-age pensioners. Association among the am
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(12), pages 1258-1290.
    8. Mary C. Daly & Peggy McDonough & Greg J. Duncan & David Williams, 1999. "Optimal indicators of socioeconomic status for health research," Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory 99-03, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

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