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Optimal indicators of socioeconomic status for health research

Author

Listed:
  • Mary C. Daly
  • Peggy McDonough
  • Greg J. Duncan
  • David Williams

Abstract

Objectives: This paper examines the relationship between various measures of SES and mortality for a representative sample of individuals. ; Methods: Data are from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Sample includes 3,734 individuals aged 45 and above who participated in the 1984 interview. Mortality was tracked between 1984 and 1994 and is related to SES indicators using Cox event-history regression models. ; Results: Wealth has the strongest associations with subsequent mortality, and these associations differ little by age and sex. Other economic measures, especially family-size-adjusted household income, have significant associations with mortality, particularly for nonelderly women. ; Conclusions: By and large, the economic components of SES have associations with mortality that are at least as strong as, and often stronger than, more conventional components (e.g., completed schooling, occupation).

Suggested Citation

  • Mary C. Daly & Peggy McDonough & Greg J. Duncan & David Williams, 1999. "Optimal indicators of socioeconomic status for health research," Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory 99-03, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfap:99-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Smith & Raynard Kington, 1997. "Demographic and economic correlates of health in old age," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(1), pages 159-170, February.
    2. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 251-299.
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1992:82:6:816-820_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Harriet Duleep, 1989. "Measuring socioeconomic mortality differentials over time," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(2), pages 345-351, May.
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1989:79:5:607-612_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Lahelma, Eero & Valkonen, Tapani, 1990. "Health and social inequities in Finland and elsewhere," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 257-265, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sharon Hadad & Yossi Hadad & Tzahit Simon-Tuval, 2013. "Determinants of healthcare system’s efficiency in OECD countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(2), pages 253-265, April.
    2. Christopher J. Boyce & Andrew J. Oswald, 2012. "Do people become healthier after being promoted?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(5), pages 580-596, May.
    3. Alessio Petrelli & Roberta Picariello & Giuseppe Costa, 2010. "Toward a needs based mechanism for capitation purposes in Italy: the role of socioeconomic level in explaining differences in the use of health services," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 29-42, March.
    4. Cooper, D. & McCausland, W.D. & Theodossiou, I., 2006. "The health hazards of unemployment and poor education: The socioeconomic determinants of health duration in the European Union," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 273-297, December.
    5. Jibum Kim & Jinkook Lee, 2010. "Disability of Older Koreans Evidence on Prevalence and the Role of Education from Five Data Sets," Working Papers 811, RAND Corporation.
    6. Torssander, Jenny & Erikson, Robert, 2008. "Stratification and Mortality - A Comparison of Education, Class, Status and Income," Working Paper Series 5/2008, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    7. Chatterjee, Swarn & Palmer, Lance & Goetz, Joseph, 2012. "Individual wealth accumulation: Why does dining together as a family matter?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1-22.
    8. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Andrew J. Houtenville & Nigar Nargis, 2001. "Economic outcomes of working-age people with disabilities over the business cycle: an examination of the 1980s and 1990s," Working Paper Series 2001-07, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

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    Keywords

    Income distribution;

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