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Distribution conventionality in the movie sector: an econometric analysis of cinema supply

Author

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  • Alan Collins

    (Department of Economics, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK)

  • Antonello E. Scorcu

    (Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)

  • Roberto Zanola

    (Department of Public Policy and Public Choice, University of Eastern Piedmont, Turin, Italy)

Abstract

This paper empirically analyzes the impact of several factors on a 'conventionality index (CI)' in the specific context of the cinema exhibition sector. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a standard CI has been constructed for this purpose. Econometric analysis of the determinants of variation in this index provides decision-makers with an empirical focus for analyzing distributional aspects of the movie exhibition market, with particular emphasis on product differentiation. Specifically, (i) do cinemas based in a city area have a different or 'specialized' focus in contrast to cinemas in small towns? or (ii) do multiplexes have a different or more specialized focus in comparison with cinemas? To this end, cross-sectional econometric models are estimated to help analyze these effects in three Italian regions for a sample of cinemas covering the 2006 season. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan Collins & Antonello E. Scorcu & Roberto Zanola, 2009. "Distribution conventionality in the movie sector: an econometric analysis of cinema supply," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(8), pages 517-527.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:30:y:2009:i:8:p:517-527
    DOI: 10.1002/mde.1469
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Fox & Grant Black, 2011. "The Rise and Decline of Drive-in Cinemas in the United States," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Leisure, chapter 14 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Darlene Chisholm & George Norman, 2012. "Spatial competition and market share: an application to motion pictures," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 36(3), pages 207-225, August.
    3. Darlene Chisholm & Margaret McMillan & George Norman, 2010. "Product differentiation and film-programming choice: do first-run movie theatres show the same films?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 34(2), pages 131-145, May.
    4. Juan Prieto-Rodriguez & Fernanda Gutierrez-Navratil & Victoria Ateca-Amestoy, 2015. "Theatre allocation as a distributor’s strategic variable over movie runs," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(1), pages 65-83, February.

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