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Cinema attendance in Europe


  • A. Sisto
  • R. Zanola


Although there exists a large body of literature which has empirically investigated the impact of various determinants on cinema attendance, studies that analyse the addictive component of cinema consumption seem to be relatively rare. The aim of this article is to empirically investigate the addictive component of cinema consumption by adopting a cross-country focus. To this aim, the Becker and Murphy's rational addiction model has been tested using a pooled cross-section and time-series data on 12 European countries over the period 1989 to 2004. Results provide evidence that cinema consumption seems to conform to a rational addiction hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • A. Sisto & R. Zanola, 2010. "Cinema attendance in Europe," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 515-517.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:5:p:515-517 DOI: 10.1080/13504850802046997

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dani Rodrik, 2006. "What's So Special about China's Exports?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 14(5), pages 1-19.
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    Cited by:

    1. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Luis Orea & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2013. "Endogeneity and measurement errors when estimating demand functions with average prices: an example from the movie market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 1477-1496, June.
    2. Castiglione, Concetta & Infante, Davide, 2014. "The evolution of theatre attendance in Italy: patrons and companies," MPRA Paper 63301, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Mar 2015.
    3. Alan Collins & Antonello E. Scorcu & Roberto Zanola, 2009. "Distribution conventionality in the movie sector: an econometric analysis of cinema supply," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(8), pages 517-527.
    4. Darlene Chisholm & George Norman, 2012. "Spatial competition and market share: an application to motion pictures," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 36(3), pages 207-225, August.
    5. Victoria Ateca-Amestoy & Concetta Castiglione, 2016. "The consumption of cultural goods through the internet. How is it affected by the digital divide?," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-04-2016, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised May 2016.
    6. Thomas Demuynck & Ewout Verriest, 2013. "I’Ll Never Forget My First Cigarette: A Revealed Preference Analysis Of The “Habits As Durables” Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54(2), pages 717-738, May.
    7. M. Rimscha, 2013. "It’s not the economy, stupid! External effects on the supply and demand of cinema entertainment," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(4), pages 433-455, November.

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