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The Long-Run Effects of Unemployment Monitoring and Work-Search Programs: Experimental Evidence from the United Kingdom


  • Peter Dolton

    (University of Newcastle)

  • Donal O'Neill

    (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)


This article examines the long-run effects of the Restart unemployment program in the United Kingdom. The program, aimed at the long-term unemployed, involved a combination of tighter monitoring of benefit eligibility rules and increased job search assistance. We compare the employment behavior of a treatment group who participated in the scheme with that of a randomly chosen control group for whom participation was delayed. While there is little evidence of a long-term benefit for women, the unemployment rate among males in the treatment group was six percentage points lower than that of the control group 5 years after the initial experiment.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Dolton & Donal O'Neill, 2002. "The Long-Run Effects of Unemployment Monitoring and Work-Search Programs: Experimental Evidence from the United Kingdom," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(2), pages 381-403, Part.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:20:y:2002:i:2:p:381-403

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Woodbury, Stephen A & Spiegelman, Robert G, 1987. "Bonuses to Workers and Employers to Reduce Unemployment: Randomized Trials in Illinois," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 513-530, September.
    2. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1995. "Assessing the Case for Social Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 85-110, Spring.
    3. Belzil, Christian, 1995. "Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment over Time: An Analysis with Event History Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 113-126, February.
    4. Curtis Eberwein & John C. Ham & Robert J. Lalonde, 1997. "The Impact of Being Offered and Receiving Classroom Training on the Employment Histories of Disadvantaged Women: Evidence from Experimental Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 655-682.
    5. Paul T. Decker, 1994. "The Impact of Reemployment Bonuses on Insured Unemployment in the New Jersey and Illinois Reemployment Bonus Experiments," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(3), pages 718-741.
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