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Active Labor Market Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Bruno Crépon

    () (Center for Research in Economics and Statistics (CREST), 92245 Malakoff, France
    Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142)

  • Gerard J. van den Berg

    (Department of Economics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH, United Kingdom
    Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142
    Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation (IFAU), 75312 Uppsala, Sweden)

Abstract

Active labor market policies are massively used with the objective being to improve labor market outcomes of individuals out of work. Many observational evaluation studies have been published. In this review, we critically assess policy effectiveness. We emphasize insights from recent randomized controlled trials. In addition, we examine policy effects that have not been the primary object of most of the past evaluations, such as anticipatory effects of advance knowledge of future treatments and equilibrium effects, and we discuss the actual implementation of policies. We discuss the importance of heterogeneity of programs and effects and examine the extent to which potential participants are interested in enrollment. We also discuss the assessment of costs and benefits of programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Crépon & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2016. "Active Labor Market Policies," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 521-546, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:8:y:2016:p:521-546
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-economics-080614-115738
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David McKenzie, 2017. "How Effective Are Active Labor Market Policies in Developing Countries? A Critical Review of Recent Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 32(2), pages 127-154.
    2. Gürtzgen, Nicole & Nolte, André & Pohlan, Laura & van den Berg, Gerard J., 2018. "Do Digital Information Technologies Help Unemployed Job Seekers Find a Job? Evidence from the Broadband Internet Expansion in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 11555, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Bergemann, Annette & Pohlan, Laura & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2017. "The impact of participation in job creation schemes in turbulent times," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 182-201.
    4. Bach, Ruben & Eckman, Stephanie, 2017. "Does participating in a panel survey change respondents' labor market behavior?," IAB Discussion Paper 201715, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Nina Pavcnik, 2017. "The Impact of Trade on Inequality in Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 23878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Michael Knaus & Michael Lechner & Anthony Strittmatter, 2017. "Heterogeneous Employment Effects of Job Search Programmes: A Machine Learning Approach," Papers 1709.10279, arXiv.org, revised May 2018.
    7. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Dauth, Christine & Homrighausen, Pia & Stephan, Gesine, 2018. "Informing Employees in Small and Medium Sized Firms about Training: Results of a Randomized Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 11963, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Dayanand S. Manoli & Marios Michaelides & Ankur Patel, 2018. "Long-Term Effects of Job-Search Assistance: Experimental Evidence Using Administrative Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 24422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. repec:eee:ecmode:v:73:y:2018:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. John P. Martin, 2017. "Policies to Expand Digital Skills for the Machine Age," Working Papers id:11688, eSocialSciences.
    11. Omar Al-Ubaydli & John List, 2019. "How natural field experiments have enhanced our understanding of unemployment," Natural Field Experiments 00649, The Field Experiments Website.
    12. Goulas, Eleftherios & Zervoyianni, Athina, 2018. "Active labour-market policies and output growth: Is there a causal relationship?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 1-14.
    13. J. Meekes & W.H.J. Hassink, 2018. "Endogenous local labour markets, regional aggregation and agglomeration economies," Working Papers 18-03, Utrecht School of Economics.
    14. Meekes, Jordy & Hassink, Wolter, 2017. "The Role of the Housing Market in Workers' Resilience to Job Displacement after Firm Bankruptcy," IZA Discussion Papers 10894, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2017:n:390 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    active labor market program; evaluation; job search assistance; matching; subsidized jobs training; unemployment; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies

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