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The impact of vocational training for the unemployed : experimental evidence from Turkey

Author

Listed:
  • Hirshleifer, Sarojini
  • McKenzie, David
  • Almeida, Rita
  • Ridao-Cano, Cristobal

Abstract

A randomized experiment is used to evaluate a large-scale, active labor market policy: Turkey's vocational training programs for the unemployed. A detailed follow-up survey of a large sample with low attrition enables precise estimation of treatment impacts and their heterogeneity. The average impact of training on employment is positive, but close to zero and statistically insignificant, which is much lower than either program officials or applicants expected. Over the first year after training, the paper finds that training had statistically significant effects on the quality of employment and that the positive impacts are stronger when training is offered by private providers. However, longer-term administrative data show that after three years these effects have also dissipated.

Suggested Citation

  • Hirshleifer, Sarojini & McKenzie, David & Almeida, Rita & Ridao-Cano, Cristobal, 2014. "The impact of vocational training for the unemployed : experimental evidence from Turkey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6807, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6807
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. repec:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:116-130 is not listed on IDEAS
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    9. Atila Abdulkadiroğlu & Joshua D. Angrist & Susan M. Dynarski & Thomas J. Kane & Parag A. Pathak, 2011. "Accountability and Flexibility in Public Schools: Evidence from Boston's Charters And Pilots," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(2), pages 699-748.
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    Cited by:

    1. Evan Borkum & Kristen Velyvis & Arif Mamun & Malik Khan Mubeen & Anca Dumitrescu & Ananya Khan, "undated". "Evaluation of MCC's Investments in Community Skills Development Centers in Namibia: Final Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 45805b53759348d48f2d0d569, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. Adriana Kugler & Maurice Kugler & Juan Saavedra & Luis Omar Herrera Prada, 2015. "Long-term Direct and Spillover Effects of Job Training: Experimental Evidence from Colombia," NBER Working Papers 21607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Garret S. Christensen & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Transparency, Reproducibility, and the Credibility of Economics Research," NBER Working Papers 22989, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. María laura Alzúa & Guillermo Cruces & Carolina Lopez, 2016. "Long-Run Effects Of Youth Training Programs: Experimental Evidence From Argentina," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(4), pages 1839-1859, October.
    5. repec:eee:labeco:v:45:y:2017:i:c:p:116-130 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Paloma Acevedo & Guillermo Cruces & Paul Gertler & Sebastian Martinez, 2017. "Living Up to Expectations: How Job Training Made Women Better Off and Men Worse Off," NBER Working Papers 23264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Camargo, Juliana & Lima, Lycia Silva e & Riva, Flavio Luiz Russo & Souza, André Portela Fernandes de, 2018. "Technical education, noncognitive skills and labor market outcomes: experimental evidence from Brazil," Textos para discussão 480, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    8. Carla Calero & Sandra V. Rozo, 2016. "The effects of youth training on risk behavior: the role of non-cognitive skills," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-27, December.
    9. Beam, Emily A. & Hyman, Joshua & Theoharides, Caroline, 2017. "The Relative Returns to Education, Experience, and Attractiveness for Young Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 10537, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Maitra, Pushkar & Mani, Subha, 2017. "Learning and earning: Evidence from a randomized evaluation in India," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 116-130.
    11. Pablo Ibarraran & Laura Ripani & Bibiana Taboada & Juan Villa & Brigida Garcia, 2014. "Life skills, employability and training for disadvantaged youth: Evidence from a randomized evaluation design," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
    12. Piza, Caio & Souza, André Portela Fernandes de, 2016. "Short and long-term effects of a child-labor ban," Textos para discussão 428, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    13. Girum Abebe & Stefano Caria & Marcel Fafchamps & Paolo Falco & Simon Franklin & Simon Quinn, 2016. "Curse of Anonymity or Tyranny of Distance? The Impacts of Job-Search Support in Urban Ethiopia," NBER Working Papers 22409, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jochen Kluve & Laura Ripani & David Rosas-Shady & Pablo Ibarraran, 2015. "Experimental Evidence on the Long Term Impacts of a Youth Training Program," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7367, Inter-American Development Bank.
    15. Clement de Chaisemartin & Luc Behaghel, 2015. "Next please! Estimating the effect of treatments allocated by randomized waiting lists," Papers 1511.01453, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2017.
    16. Chakravorty, Bhaskar & Bedi, Arjun S., 2017. "Skills Training and Employment Outcomes in Rural Bihar," IZA Discussion Papers 10902, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Torun, Huzeyfe & Tumen, Semih, 2017. "Do Vocational High School Graduates Have Better Employment Outcomes than General High School Graduates?," IZA Discussion Papers 10507, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Jochen Kluve, 2014. "Youth labor market interventions," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 106-106, December.
    19. María Laura Alzúa & Guillermo Cruces & Carolina Lopez, 2015. "Youth Training Programs Beyond Employment. Experimental Evidence from Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0177, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Labor Policies; Access&Equity in Basic Education; Primary Education; Education For All;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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