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Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Kuhn
  • Mikal Skuterud

Abstract

Using the December 1998 and August 2000 CPS Computer and Internet Supplements matched with subsequent CPS files, we ask which types of unemployed workers looked for work on line and whether Internet searchers became reemployed more quickly. In our data, Internet searchers have observed characteristics that are typically associated with shorter unemployment spells, and do spend less time unemployed. This unemployment differential is however eliminated and in some cases reversed when we hold observable characteristics constant. We conclude that either Internet job search is ineffective in reducing unemployment durations, or Internet job searchers are negatively selected on unobservables.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kuhn & Mikal Skuterud, 2004. "Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 218-232, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:94:y:2004:i:1:p:218-232
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282804322970779
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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    1. Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations (AER 2004) in ReplicationWiki
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