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Employment in Poland 2013. Labour in the Age of Structural Change

Editor

Listed:
  • Piotr Lewandowski
  • Iga Magda

Author

Listed:
  • Piotr Lewandowski
  • Pawel Chrostek
  • Jan Baran
  • Iga Magda
  • Maciej Lis
  • Anna Pankowiec
  • Piotr Szczerba
  • Maciej Bitner
  • Magdalena Kaminska

Abstract

This edition, entitled Labour in The Age of Structural Change, is devoted to the assessment of structural changes in Poland and otherEU and OECD countries, and their impact on the labour markets. The report is divided into four parts. The first part of the report entitled Labour Demand and the Challenges of Restructuring focuses on the changes of the volume and composition of the demand for labour as a result of restructuring processes in the economy in the long term. Apart from the analysis of trends observed so far, we present a projection of labour demand in Poland and other EU countries. In the second part (Labour Supply in the Face of Population Ageing) the analysis of the impact of demographic changes on the changes in the structure of the labour supply in Poland and other EU and OECD countries has been conducted, highlighting the transformations of the labour supply structure with respect to education and including the labour supply forecasts in the future. The third part (Labour in The Green Economy) focuses on the influence that may be exerted on the labour markets in Europe and in Poland by the reconstruction of the economic growth model into more environment-friendly one. The fourth part (The Time of Technology – Labour and Labour Market Institutions in the 21st Century) analyses the challenges resulting from the ICT progress for the labour markets, including the institutional perspective concerning the role that could be played by the labour market institutions, educational policy and the innovation support policy. Recommendations for public policy are the last part of the report.

Suggested Citation

  • Piotr Lewandowski & Pawel Chrostek & Jan Baran & Iga Magda & Maciej Lis & Anna Pankowiec & Piotr Szczerba & Maciej Bitner & Magdalena Kaminska, 2014. "Employment in Poland 2013. Labour in the Age of Structural Change," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2013 edited by Piotr Lewandowski & Iga Magda, january.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:bookkk:zwp2013
    as

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    File URL: http://ibs.org.pl/app/uploads/2015/10/zwp_2013_pl.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "Do entrants take it all? The evolution of task content of jobs in Poland," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 47.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    employment; Poland; labour demand; labour supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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