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Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?

  • Kuhn, Peter J.

    ()

    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  • Mansour, Hani

    ()

    (University of Colorado Denver)

While the Internet has been found to reduce trading frictions in a number of other markets, existing research has failed to detect such an effect in the labor market. In this paper, we replicate Kuhn and Skuterud's (2004) study – which found that Internet job search (IJS) was associated with longer unemployment durations in 1998/2000 – using comparable data from a decade later. We find that IJS now appears to be effective: it reduces individual workers' unemployment durations by about 25 percent. This finding is robust to controls for workers' AFQT scores and detailed indicators of Internet access. IJS appears to be most effective in reducing unemployment durations when used to contact friends and relatives, to send out resumes or fill out applications, and also to look at ads. We detect no effect of IJS on wage growth between jobs.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5955.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: The Economic Journal, 2014, [Online First]
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5955
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  1. Andrea Weber & Helmut Mahringer, 2014. "Choice and Success of Job Search Methods," Working Papers id:5877, eSocialSciences.
  2. Kuhn, Peter J. & Skuterud, Mikal, 2002. "Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations," IZA Discussion Papers 613, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Betsey Stevenson, 2009. "The Internet and Job Search," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 67-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Osberg, L., 1989. "Fishing In Different Pools: Job Search Strategies And Job-Finding Success In Canada In The Early 1980s," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 89-03, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  5. John T. Addison & Pedro Portugal, 2002. "Job search methods and outcomes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 505-533, July.
  6. Harry J. Holzer, 1986. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," NBER Working Papers 1859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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