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Which one to choose? New evidence on the choice and success of job search methods

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  • Stephan Thomsen

    () (Faculty of Economics and Management, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)

  • Mick Wittich

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on the choice and success of six different job search channels comprising the public employment agency, advertisements in newspapers and journals, internet job search, recruitment agencies, direct applications, and the social network. In addition, job search intensity and its effects are regarded. Relying on panel data for Germany, we are able to consider observed and unobserved heterogeneity in the estimation. In line with findings for other countries, the results show that consideration of various channels in individual job search increases the employment chances. With regard to the determinants, the estimates exhibit clear differences between the job search channels and with respect to search intensity. The results for success of the job search channels reveal that the public employment agency is ineffective and even harms the employment chances of the unemployed job seekers. In contrast, direct application for jobs and internet job search provide successful channels and increase the employment chances.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan Thomsen & Mick Wittich, 2009. "Which one to choose? New evidence on the choice and success of job search methods," FEMM Working Papers 09022, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:mag:wpaper:09022
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ww.uni-magdeburg.de/fwwdeka/femm/a2009_Dateien/2009_22.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Karl Brenke & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2007. "Erfolgreiche Arbeitssuche weiterhin meist über informelle Kontakte und Anzeigen," DIW Wochenbericht, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 74(20), pages 325-331.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaan Masso & Raul Eamets & Pille Mõtsmees, 2013. "The Effect Of Migration Experience On Occupational Mobility In Estonia," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 92, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job search; unemployment; job placement; Germany; SOEP;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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