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Job Search Methods and Their Success: A Comparison of Immigrants and Natives in the UK

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  • Paul Frijters
  • Michael A. Shields
  • Stephen Wheatley Price

Abstract

A major issue in the immigration debate concerns whether immigrants take jobs away from natives. In this article, we present new evidence on the job search methods used by immigrants, and their relative success in gaining employment, in the UK. We find that: (1) immigrant job search is less successful than that of natives; (2) immigrants are as likely to gain employment through informal methods as via verifiable routes; (3) the probability of success increases with years since migration. The finding that immigrants do not effectively compete for jobs may help explain why immigration has little impact on native employment. Copyright 2005 Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2005. "Job Search Methods and Their Success: A Comparison of Immigrants and Natives in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 359-376, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:115:y:2005:i:507:p:f359-f376
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Morescalchi, 2016. "A new career in a new town. Job search methods and regional mobility of unemployed workers," ERSA conference papers ersa16p307, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Miguel Ángel Alcobendas & Núria Rodríquez-Planas, 2010. "Immigrants' Assimilation Process In A Segmented Labor Market," Working Papers 442, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. ., 2012. "Migration impact assessment: a state of the art," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 1, pages 3-62 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Badi H. Baltagi & YingDeng & Xiangjun Ma, 2017. "Network Effects on LaborContracts of Internal Migrants in China- A Spatial Autoregressive Model," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 207, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    5. Timothy J. Hatton, 2011. "The Social and Labor Market Outcomes of Ethnic Minorities in the UK," Chapters,in: Ethnic Diversity in European Labor Markets, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Cahit Guven & Asadul Islam, 2015. "Age at Migration, Language Proficiency, and Socioeconomic Outcomes: Evidence From Australia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 513-542, April.
    7. Glitz, Albrecht, 2017. "Coworker networks in the labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 218-230.
    8. Nijkamp, P. & Poot, H.J., 2012. "Migration impact assessment: A state of the art," Serie Research Memoranda 0009, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    9. Christian Dustmann & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2010. "Ethnic minority immigrants and their children in Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 209-233, April.
    10. Ciro Avitabile & Irma Clots-Figueras & Paolo Masella, 2013. "The Effect of Birthright Citizenship on Parental Integration Outcomes," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(3), pages 777-810.
    11. Sholeh A. Maani, 2016. "Ethnic networks and location choice of immigrants," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 284-284, August.
    12. Maani, Sholeh A. & Wang, Xingang & Rogers, Alan, 2015. "Network Effects, Ethnic Capital and Immigrants' Earnings Assimilation: Evidence from a Spatial, Hausman-Taylor Estimation," IZA Discussion Papers 9308, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Stephan Thomsen & Mick Wittich, 2009. "Which one to choose? New evidence on the choice and success of job search methods," FEMM Working Papers 09022, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    14. Helsley, Robert W. & Zenou, Yves, 2014. "Social networks and interactions in cities," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 426-466.
    15. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Taylor, Mark P., 2012. "Non-employment, age, and the economic cycle," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57589, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    16. Priscillia Hunt, 2012. "From the bottom to the top: a more complete picture of the immigrant-native wage gap in Britain," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-18, December.
    17. DavidG. Blanchflower & Chris Shadforth, 2009. "Fear, Unemployment and Migration," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(535), pages 136-182, February.
    18. Javier Vázquez-Grenno, 2012. "Job search methods in times of crisis: native and immigrant strategies in Spain," Working Papers 2012/19, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    19. Jonathan Levie, 2007. "Immigration, In-Migration, Ethnicity and Entrepreneurship in the United Kingdom," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 143-169, March.
    20. Giovanni Facchini & Eleonora Patacchini & Max F. Steinhardt, 2015. "Migration, Friendship Ties, and Cultural Assimilation," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 619-649, April.
    21. Topa, Giorgio & Zenou, Yves, 2015. "Neighborhood and Network Effects," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    22. Tito Boeri & Marta De Philippis & Eleonora Patacchini & Michele Pellizzari, 2011. "Immigration, Housing Discrimination and Employment," Working Papers 390, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    23. Morando, Greta, 2014. "Partner ethnicity and ethnic minority socio- economic occupation: evidence from the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    24. Fang, Tony & Samnani, Al-Karim & Novicevic, Milorad M. & Bing, Mark N., 2013. "Liability-of-foreignness effects on job success of immigrant job seekers," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 98-109.
    25. Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), 2011. "Ethnic Diversity in European Labor Markets," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13572.

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