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The Labour Market in the New Information Economy

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  • Richard B. Freeman

Abstract

The extension of information and communication technologies (ICT) to economic activity is changing the labour market in important ways, This article shows that computerization and use of the Internet are associated with greater hours worked as well as higher wages; that ICT occupations are rapidly increasing their share of employment; that job search and recruitment are moving rapidly to the Web, with consequences for matching employers and employees; and, possibly most important of all, that trade unions have begun to use the Internet as a tool for servicing members and carrying their messages to the public, raising the possibility of a major change in the nature of the union movement. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard B. Freeman, 2002. "The Labour Market in the New Information Economy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 288-305.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:18:y:2002:i:3:p:288-305
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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