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Employment relationships in the new economy

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  • Neumark, David
  • Reed, Deborah

Abstract

It is often argued that 'new economy' jobs are less likely to use traditional employment relationships, and more likely to rely on 'alternative' or 'contingent' work. When we look at new economy jobs classified on the basis of employment in high-tech industries, we do not find greater use of contingent or alternative employment relationships. However, when we classify new economy workers based on residence in high-tech cities, contingent and alternative employment relationships are more common, even after accounting for the faster employment growth in these cities. Finally, defining 'new economy' more literally to be those industries with the fastest growth yields the most striking differences, as workers in the fastest-growing industries are much more likely to be in contingent or alternative employment relationships, with a large share of this difference driven by employment in the fast-growing construction and personnel supply services industries where employment is perhaps 'intrinsically' contingent or alternative. While subject to numerous qualifications, the combined evidence gives some support to the hypothesis that the new economy may entail a possibly significant and long-lasting increase in contingent and alternative employment relationships.
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  • Neumark, David & Reed, Deborah, 2004. "Employment relationships in the new economy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:11:y:2004:i:1:p:1-31
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    Cited by:

    1. P. Laplagne & M. Glover & T. Fry, 2005. "The Growth of Labour Hire Employment in Australia," Staff Working Papers 0501, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    2. Philippe Askenazy & Eva Moreno Galbis, 2007. "The Impact of Technological and Organizational Changes on Labor Flows. Evidence on French Establishments," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(2), pages 265-301, June.
    3. Kapás, Judit & Czeglédi, Pál, 2008. "Technológiai és intézményi változások a munkapiacon és a vállalati szervezetben. Nyugat- és kelet-közép-európai összehasonlítás
      [Technological and institutional changes on the labour market and in
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(4), pages 308-332.
    4. Judit KAPà S & Pál CZEGLÉDI, 2007. "What Does Transition Mean?: Post-socialist and Western European Countries Paralleled," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 3, pages 3-28, December.
    5. Luc Behaghel & Julie Moschion, 2011. "Skilled labor supply, IT-based technical change and job instability," PSE Working Papers halshs-00646595, HAL.
    6. Richard B. Freeman, 2002. "The Labour Market in the New Information Economy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 288-305.
    7. Luc Behaghel & Julie Moschion, 2011. "Skilled labor supply, IT-based technical change and job instability," Working Papers halshs-00646595, HAL.
    8. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2005. "Agency Working in Britain: Character, Consequences and Regulation," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 249-271, June.
    9. R. Aeberhardt & C. Marbot, 2013. "Evolution of Instability on the French Labour Market during the Last Thirty Years," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2013-08, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
    10. Luc Behaghel & Eve Caroli & Emmanuelle Walkowiak, 2009. "Do internal labour markets survive in the New Economy? The Case of France," Working Papers halshs-00567682, HAL.
    11. Askenazy, Philippe & Moreno-Galbis, Eva, 2007. "Technological and Organizational Changes, and Labor Flows: Evidence on French Establishments," IZA Discussion Papers 2549, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General

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