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Which workers gain upon adopting a computer?

  • Cindy Zoghi
  • Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia

Using the Canadian Workplace and Employee Survey and controlling for individual and establishment fixed-effects, we find that within a year of adopting a computer, the average worker earns a 3.6% higher wage than a worker who did not use a computer. Returns are even larger for managers and professionals, highly educated workers, and those with significant prior computer experience. Employees who adopt computers for use with applications that require high cognitive skills earn the highest returns.

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Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 40 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 423-444

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:40:y:2007:i:2:p:423-444
Contact details of provider: Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
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