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What Happens to the Careers of European Workers when Immigrants "Take their Jobs"?

Author

Listed:
  • Cristina Cattaneo

    (FEEM)

  • Carlo V. Fiorio

    (University of Milano and Econpubblica)

  • Giovanni Peri

    (University of California, Davis and NBER)

Abstract

Following a representative longitudinal sample of native European residents, over the period 1995-2001, we identify the effect of the inflows of immigrants on their career, employment and wages. We use the 1991 distribution of immigrants by nationality across European labor markets to construct an imputed inflow of the foreign-born population that is exogenous to local demand shocks. We also control for .fixed effects that absorb individual, country-year, occupation group-year and occupation group-country heterogeneity and shocks. We find that native European workers are more likely to move to occupations associated with higher skills and status when a larger number of immigrants enter their labor market. As a consequence of this upward mobility their wage income also increases with a 1-2 years lag. We find no evidence of an increase in their probability of becoming unemployed.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Cattaneo & Carlo V. Fiorio & Giovanni Peri, 2014. "What Happens to the Careers of European Workers when Immigrants "Take their Jobs"?," Working Papers 2014.54, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2014.54
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    File URL: https://www.feem.it/m/publications_pages/NDL2014-054.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Immigration, class & ideology
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2013-06-29 17:52:28
    2. Cutting waste
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2013-07-16 18:32:19
    3. Labour's cost of living problem
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2013-08-24 16:11:51
    4. Equality, growth & policy
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2014-03-05 19:13:12
    5. "British workers hit hard"
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2014-04-22 18:28:12
    6. Elites or people?
      by chris in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2016-12-01 19:13:41

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bosetti, Valentina & Cattaneo, Cristina & Verdolini, Elena, 2015. "Migration of skilled workers and innovation: A European Perspective," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 311-322.
    2. Lewis, Ethan & Peri, Giovanni, 2015. "Immigration and the Economy of Cities and Regions," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 625-685, Elsevier.
    3. Barone, Guglielmo & D'Ignazio, Alessio & de Blasio, Guido & Naticchioni, Paolo, 2016. "Mr. Rossi, Mr. Hu and politics. The role of immigration in shaping natives' voting behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 1-13.
    4. Barone, Guglielmo & D'Ignazio, Alessio & de Blasio, Guido & Naticchioni, Paolo, 2014. "Mr. Rossi, Mr. Hu and Politics: The Role of Immigration in Shaping Natives' Political Preferences," IZA Discussion Papers 8228, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. World Bank, 2017. "Europe and Central Asia Economic Update, October 2017," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 28534, September.
    6. Daniela Costa & Maria Jose Rodriguez, 2020. "North-North Migration and Agglomeration in the European Union 15," Working Papers 2020-07, Banco de México.
    7. Mette Foged & Giovanni Peri, 2013. "Immigrants' and Native Workers: New Analysis on Longitudinal Data," NBER Working Papers 19315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Labanca, Claudio, 2020. "The effects of a temporary migration shock: Evidence from the Arab Spring migration through Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    9. Amelie F. Constant, 2014. "Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-10, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; Job Upgrading; Mobility; Self-employment; Europe;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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